WATCH: Cory Booker Goes All In For AOC’s Green New Deal: Like Fighting Nazis

"Our planet is in peril"

Sen. Cory Booker, (D-NJ), speaks to reporters, after U.S. President Donald Trump's second State of the Union address to a joint session of Congress at the U.S. Capitol in Washington, D.C., on Tuesday, Feb. 5, 2019.
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Not only is Sen. Cory Booker (D-NJ) running for president, but he's running on a platform of far-reaching promises. Indeed, "Spartacus" has endorsed Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez's (D-NY) "Green New Deal" proposal and has even likened it to our fighting the Nazis.

 

Speaking at a campaign event in Mason City, Iowa, Booker said that the "Green New Deal" is a bold solution that Americans need to save their planet.

"We have to deal with this," Booker said. "Our planet is in peril, and we need to be bold. It’s one of the reasons I signed on to the resolution. I co-sponsored the resolution for the Green New Deal."

The "Green New Deal" outlines a variety of insane proposals. Here's what Daily Wire Editor-in-Chief Ben Shapiro said of it:

The proposal calls for the United States to be free of carbon emissions within 10 years without the use of nuclear power. It calls for every building in the United States to be replaced or retrofitted in green fashion. It calls for universal healthcare, free college education, the replacement of airplanes with high-speed trains, charging stations "everywhere" (this is the sort of exactness the proposal contains), replacement of "every combustion-engine vehicle," government-provided jobs, family and medical leave, vacations, retirement security, and the abolition of "farting cows." It also calls for total "economic security" for anyone "unable or unwilling to work."

 

Obviously, none of those proposals are remotely feasible. In fact, the only part of the document that seems to have a shred of practicality is the portion that calls for planting "lots of trees." Booker, however, feels that critics of the deal's practicality have a short-sighted vision.

"There’s a lot of people blowing back on the Green New Deal. They’re going, ‘Oh, it’s impractical, oh it’s too expensive, oh it’s all of this," Booker said. "If we used to govern our dreams that way, we would have never gone to the moon."

 

Booker then went into full "Spartacus" mode when he likened the Green New Deal's goals to that of fighting Nazis. He said, "We need to be bold again in America. We need to have dreams that other people say are impossible. We need to push the bounds of human potential. Because that is our history. When the planet has been in peril in the past, who came forward to save the earth from the scourge of Nazi and totalitarian regimes? We came forward. Who came forward to save the planet or continents from financial ruin? We came forward with the Marshall Plan."

The senator from New Jersey announced his candidacy for 2020 earlier this month. Since then, he has made headlines for trying to push upon judicial nominees what some have interpreted as a religious litmus test. In an exchange with Neomi Rao, a nominee for the U.S. Court of Appeals for the D.C. Circuit, Booker questioned her about the morality of homosexual relationships:

Booker: Are gay relationships, in your opinion, immoral?

Rao: Um, senator, I'm not sure the relevance of that.

Booker: I think it is relevant to your opinion. Do you think African American relationships are immoral? Do you think gay relationships are immoral?

Rao: No. I do not.

Booker: You do not believe that. Do you believe they are a sin?

Rao: Senator, my personal views on any of these subjects are things I would put to one side, and I would faithfully follow precedent—

Booker: So you're not willing to say here whether you believe it is sinful for two men to be married — you're not willing to comment on that?

Rao: Senator … No.

Booker: Excuse me?

Rao: I’m sorry?

Booker: I didn't hear your response.

Rao: My response is that these personal views are ones that I would put to one side. Whatever my personal views are on the subject, I would faithfully follow the precedent of the Supreme Court.

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