WATCH: Klavan Dismantles NYT Op-Ed Asking If Human Extinction Would Be A Tragedy

The New York Times recently published an opinion piece by a professor asking the question "Would the extinction of humanity be a tragedy?" Now, most of us will immediately conclude just how ridiculous the premise is, but some people — some people on the Left, to be more precise — think this idea actually carries some weight. Daily Wire podcast host Andrew Klavan breaks it down as only he can and, in the process, reveals how the op-ed demonstrates why the Left is so wrong about so many things.

"There is an article by Todd May, writing in The New York Times, that said, 'Would the extinction of humanity be a tragedy?' It’s important because of the way he’s thinking and why he’s wrong," said Klavan. "In the middle of this article, he kind of flirts with some of the reasons why he’s wrong and he dithers about them for a while. But here’s the thing, every value that he’s talking about in the article — being kind, for instance — is a human value and would cease to exist without humans to notice it. The idea that consciousness is a good and suffering is a bad is a human value."

Klavan explained: "So when you say, would it be good for us to die? The question is, good for whom? If we weren't there, the goodness of our dying would be erased, right? Any good that would come of our dying wouldn't be there. Good and evil, human values, things that we see on earth, that we create and we understand."

"Now, what happens when you reason without God," Klavan asked. "Because there is a God, and because things only make sense with God, who exists, right? When you remove him, in order to reason at all, in order to speak at all, you have to put something back in its place. What does professor Todd May put in its place? He puts himself. He puts the idea that his reasoning about this, his thinking about this, is somehow important enough so he can destroy anybody who could think the way he thinks, and who reasons the way he reasons. His entire conversation would vanish off the face of the earth."

Video and transcript below:

There is an article by Todd May, writing in The New York Times, that said "would the extinction of humanity be a tragedy?" It’s important because of the way he’s thinking and why he’s wrong. In the middle of this article he kind of flirts with some of the reasons why he’s wrong and he dithers about them for a while. But here’s the thing, every value that he’s talking about in the article - being kind, for instance - is a human value and would cease to exist without humans to notice it. The idea that consciousness is a good and suffering is a bad is a human value. The value of other peoples, of other consciousness, of animal consciousness, is a human value. The lion that rips the throat out of the antelope does not give a crap about the antelope's consciousness. That value of another creature’s consciousness is a human value. No humans, no value. We give that value. We bring that value with us. This is why God had Adam name the animals, because we create those values because we can put them into word and in words we can explore their meaning and create values. Just to know consciousness, just to want consciousness, just to avoid a truck coming at you is not giving value to something or giving meaning something. You have to have language to do that.

So, when you say, would it be good for us to die? The question is, good for whom? If we weren't there, the goodness of our dying would be erased, right? Any good that would come of our dying wouldn't be there. Good and evil, human values, things that we see on earth, that we create and we understand.

To pause just a minute, let's talk about the only important thing about the Earth. When people say we must save the Earth, Gaia, our mother earth. The Earth is a rock, it’s a piece of rock floating in the vastness of space spinning around a star just in the right place to support life. The only thing important about that rock is life. The only thing important about life is human consciousness. Why? Because it gives value to everything. It is the thing that gives value to everything.

Now some of you may say, now wait a minute, what about God? Now that of course is exactly the question. When we see these values, when we see the value of another consciousness, are we seeing something that’s there? Or are we creating that value? Is it just valuable to us? I would say we’re just discovering that value. The value is there, but we’re discovering it. The reason it’s there is because God sees that consciousness as well. Obviously this professor doesn’t think that because it he saw that the value of the other animals' consciousness was absolute, he would also see that the value of our consciousness is absolute and the value of the consciousness of generations to is also absolute because that also exists in the mind of God. He is reasoning without God. Now, what happens when you reason without God? Because there is a God, and because things only make sense with God, who exists, right? When you remove him, in order to reason at all, in order to speak at all, you have to put something back in its place. What does professor Todd May put in its place? He puts himself. He puts the idea that his reasoning about this, his thinking about this, is somehow important enough so he can destroy anybody who could think the way he thinks. And who reasons the way he reasons. His entire conversation would vanish off the face of the earth.

Listen to more of The Andrew Klavan Show on iTunes here.

 
 
 

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