AZ Dem Senate Candidate Said 17 Months After 9/11 That She Didn't Care If Americans Joined The Taliban

 Congresswoman Kyrsten Sinema speaks onstage at The Human Rights Campaign 2018 Los Angeles Gala Dinner at JW Marriott Los Angeles at L.A.
Rich Fury / Stringer / Getty Images

In February 2003, appearing on a radio show hosted by a local libertarian activist the day before an anti-war event that was protesting U.S. involvement in Afghanistan, Krysten Sinema, who is running in 2018 as the Democratic Party’s candidate for the Arizona Senate, told the host, Ernest Hancock, that she didn’t care if Americans wanted to fight for the Taliban.

The exchange started with Hancock asking Sinema if she would oppose him joining the Taliban, saying, “Now you would say, maybe we do owe something to the world, as long as it's nice and sweet and peaceful and what you want to do.”

Sinema responded, "Well, it's not so much a candy cane kind of theory as you're making it stand out. But I do think that those of us who are privileged to have more do owe something to others."

Hancock asked, "By force? By me, as an individual, if I want to go fight in the Taliban army, I go over there and I'm fighting for the Taliban. I'm saying that's a personal decision ..."

Sinema asserted, "Fine. I don't care if you want to do that, go ahead."

At the event the next day, as reported by CNN's KFile, a flyer distributed by an group led by Sinema showed an American soldier as a skeleton inflicting "U.S. terror" in Iraq and the Middle East.

Audio below starting at 2:28:

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