More than 110,000 Muslim refugees have entered Europe since January, according to the latest estimates. The vast majority of refugees entered through the Greek islands.

On Tuesday, the International Organization for Migration announced that a staggering 102,547 migrants landed on islands of Greece. Another 7,507 migrants landed in Italy since January.

According to Daily Mail (UK), “Greek authorities said the majority were Syrians, Afghans, Iraqis, Iranians and Pakistanis. Others were from Morocco, Bangladesh and Somalia.”

Greece is bearing the brunt of the mass migration as registration facilities and processing centers surpass capacity. Europe has, for the most part, welcomed the bottleneck effect. As long as refugees flood through a single corridor in Greece, other countries in Europe won’t have to deal with the logistics of initial contact. The small, economically dysfunctional country feels like it’s receiving the short end of the stick.

This sense of inequity was only reinforced by the fact that Greece was left out of a planned Balkans migration meeting in Austria scheduled on Tuesday.

“Through this one-sided and not at all friendly move towards our country, there is an attempt to take decisions in Greece's absence that directly affect Greece and Greek borders,” stated the Greek interior ministry.

Neighboring Macedonia has already tightened border security after waves of Afghan migrants attempted to cross its border. On Sunday, Macedonia abruptly closed its border to all Afghans. The new measures prompted a mass protest with 600 migrants confronting Macedonian police. A few attempted to climb the border. They were quickly detained by Macedonian authorities.

While Macedonia is still permitting refugees from Iraq and Syria to flow through its boundaries, border officials are applying strict document checks, stirring an outcry from the European Union.

The Daily Mail (UK) reports, “Macedonian border officials were now only allowing passage to Syrians and Iraqis with passports, rejecting other identity papers furnished under EU regulations to refugees without passports at the island registration points, [according to a Greek official].”

On Tuesday, the International Organization for Migration announced that a staggering 102,547 migrants landed on islands of Greece.

Europe is at a loss for solutions. The continent neither has the infrastructure nor resources to deal with the largest migrant crisis since the end of WWII. Greece, and even Macedonia for that matter, will likely institute more stringent refugee policies, refusing to do Europe’s dirty work any longer. Eastern European states, like Hungary, have already begun to push back against EU mandates. As the migrant crisis gets worse, more EU neighboring countries will go rogue, rebelling against Europe’s centralized planning and bureaucratic pressures. This in turn will fracture the continent even further. Whether it knows it or not, the European Union is headed for a death spiral.