The National Education Association has a ready excuse for its refusal to discuss the possibility of armed guards on school campuses: it's too sad.

Horrors have occurred lately at American college campuses, including a shooting at Umpqua Community College in Roseburg, Oregon, as well as another shooting Saturday at Northern Arizona University.

Naturally, families of college students across the U.S. are worried about their children walking around college campuses unprotected and unarmed. The Daily Wire responded by asking the National Education Association whether it condoned armed guards on school campuses in the wake of the Roseburg tragedy.

As the largest labor union in the United States, the NEA's stated mission is advocate on behalf of education and "prepare every student to succeed a diverse and interdependent world." So in reaching out to the NEA, The Daily Wire had assumed that the NEA could be useful for something, in this case addressing a valid concern for families of college students.

But alas, the NEA proved useless as ever. The NEA responded to The Daily Wire that it was too focused on its own "grief" to address the issue.

"We honestly have not even begun to discuss anything other than the profound sense of sadness we're all feeling about what happened yesterday," Laila Hirschfeld, a communications consultant for the NEA, said in an email to The Daily Wire. "It's still quite raw."

"What I can tell you is that up to this point Roseburg has been, and I suspect will continue to be, an incredibly safe, relatively crime-free community."

Laila Hirschfeld, communications consultant for the NEA

Perhaps 'useless' is too strong a word to describe the NEA. After all, they have been useful as a fully-staffed weeping committee for families of the Roseburg victims. They have even done so without getting in people's way, weeping for the victims and their families in their offices. They feel others' pain and others don't even know it.

Moreover, the NEA is useful in assuring parents that they have nothing to worry about, and should try not to think about their children potentially being murdered at school.

"What I can tell you," Hirschfeld stated, "is that up to this point Roseburg has been, and I suspect will continue to be, an incredibly safe, relatively crime-free community."

That should make all the difference.