HACKED: Macy’s Says Thousands of Customer Names, Credit Card Numbers Exposed

If you have an account on Macys.com or Bloomingdales.com, beware, your private credit card information may have been compromised.

Department store Macy’s said Wednesday morning that hackers infiltrated the company’s website, gaining access to thousands of customer’s accounts. These customers’ names, credit card numbers and expiration dates, have all been compromised. Customers from Macys.com and Bloomingdales.com had their login information taken from other sites, which was then used to access the retailer’s websites.

Macy’s is just now announcing the hack, even though it happened over six weeks between April and June before it was stopped.

"We are aware of a data security incident involving a small number of our customers," a Macy's spokesperson told CBS MoneyWatch. "We have investigated the matter thoroughly, addressed the cause and, as a precaution, have implemented additional security measures."

The company said it had contacted individuals whose information was hacked, so be sure to check your email or mail in case you might have missed the notice.

At this point, it seems like no one except cave-dwelling hermits could reasonably believe their sensitive information is safe. CBS points out that Adidas, Boeing, Delta Air Lines, Hudson Bay and Under Armour have all been targeted by hackers, exposing millions of consumers’ information.

Back in 2011, Sony’s Playstation Network was hacked, exposing the personal details of some 77 million users. In 2015, health insurer Anthem was hacked, compromising 80 million patients’ data. In 2017, retailer Target paid $18.5 million dollars to settle a lawsuit revolving around a 2013 hack of millions of its customers' information. Equifax, a large credit-reporting agency, had its website breached last year, and counts a whopping 148 million Americans as being impacted.

Add all of this to 2015’s underreported (and now-forgotten) hack of the government’s Office of Personnel Management, which resulted in the breach of 21.5 million social security numbers.

This isn’t even an exhaustive list of data breaches. The bottom line is that it seems no one is safe from having their data compromised.

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