Liberal, white, tasteless rapper Macklemore just dropped a social-justice-warrior-propaganda-packed song called “White Privilege II,” a follow-up to the apology for his skin color song released in 2005, “White Privilege.”

Besides being another song where the “rapper” simply talks his lyrics as opposed to actually rapping, the song yet again pushes the leftist ideology of the “pro-gay rapper." In "White Privilege II" (apparently he couldn't come up with a more creative title) the rapper scolds other performers for appropriating black culture, bashes law enforcement, apologizes for his success—which is supposedly a “product” of his own whiteness—lectures whites for their privilege, and promotes Black Lives Matter as the “Blood in the streets, no justice, no peace / No racist beliefs, no rest 'til we're free” hook replays over and over.

Macklemore opens the song by illustrating his timidity as a white man attending a Black Lives Matter protest—and, of course, gets in a few lines bashing law enforcement.

Okay, I'm saying that they're chanting out, "Black lives matter", but I don't say it back

Is it okay for me to say? I don't know, so I watch and stand

In front of a line of police that look the same as me

Only separated by a badge, a baton, a can of Mace, a mask

A shield, a gun with gloves and hands that gives an alibi

In case somebody dies behind a bullet that flies out of the 9

Takes another child's life on sight

The white rapper then goes straight to the SJW-playbook and calls out performers Miley Cyrus, Iggy Azalea and, oddly, Elvis by name for their appropriation of black culture. Again, he's a white rapper.

You've exploited and stolen the music, the moment

The magic, the passion, the fashion, you toy with

The culture was never yours to make better

You're Miley, you're Elvis, you're Iggy Azalea

Fake and so plastic, you've heisted the magic

You've taken the drums and the accent you rapped in

The artist then makes it a point to explain that white supremacy is not just a “dude in Idaho,” but the “foundation” of America and “our country's lineage, designed for us to be indifferent.” Adding that his “success is the product of the same system that let off Darren Wilson guilty.”

White supremacy isn't just a white dude in Idaho

White supremacy protects the privilege I hold

White supremacy is the soil, the foundation, the cement and the flag that flies outside of my home

White supremacy is our country's lineage, designed for us to be indifferent

My success is the product of the same system that let off Darren Wilson guilty

We want to dress like, walk like, talk like, dance like, yet we just stand by

We take all we want from black culture, but will we show up for black lives?” he asks later in the song. "Your silence is a luxury," the song declares.

An interlude advocating for Black Lives Matter comes toward the end of the 9-plus minute song, where white people are instructed to have “those very difficult, very painful conversations with your parents, with your family members” about race.

Black Lives Matter, to use an analogy, is like if there was a subdivision and a house was on fire. The fire department wouldn't show up and start putting water on all the houses because all houses matter. They would show up and they would turn their water on the house that is burning because that's the house that needs it the most. My generation's taken on the torch of a very age-old fight for black liberation, but also liberation for everyone, and injustice anywhere is still injustice everywhere. The best thing white people can do is talk to each other. And having those very difficult, very painful conversations with your parents, with your family members. I think one of the critical questions for white people in this society is what are you willing to risk, what are you willing to sacrifice to create a more just society?

Ryan Lewis and Jamila Woods are also featured on the song.

Behold our racial-healer:

Here’s one last drop of “knowledge” from the great intellect of our time, Macklemore.

Here's the audio for "White Privilege II."