Radical Muslim Fulanis murdered 19 civilians in Northeast regions of Nigeria in a deadly attack that is thought to be a revenge attack against a militia from a predominantly Christian area.

In late February, Christians living in the Numan and Demsa areas of Adamawa state, found them themselves under attack by extremists following the formation of militias who seek to defend themselves against the terror group Boko Haram and heavily-armed Muslim Fulani herdsmen, according to Morning Star News.

Among the casualties are members of the Lutheran Church of Christ in Nigeria (LCCN) and the local Roman Catholic Church.

The violence was tempered only when the Nigerian army was deployed to stop the assault, killing ten of the extremists and capturing six.

Brig. Gen. Texas Chukwu said in a statement, "Troops deployed in the Numan Local Government Area of Adamawa state swiftly responded to a distress call and supported troops at Gwamba village, which was under attack by herdsmen on Tuesday."

"Despite the swift reaction to rescue the village from destruction, the notorious herdsmen set the village ablaze before troops could get to the community," he added.

The Christian Bachama tribe formed militias to challenge the radical Islamic terror groups, leading to further deaths of civilians as the two sides continue to clash, according to a report from This Day.

This follows attacks on January 22 and 25, when radical Islamic terrorists burned down dozens of houses and murdered eight innocent civilians.

Catholic bishop of the Yola Diocese Rt. Rev. Stephen Dami Mamza criticized the government for not doing enough to stop the violence.

“It is on record that less than one week ago, no fewer than 20 innocent Christian farmers were killed in separate attacks in and around Tambo,” he said. “This is dangerous and reprehensible, as the law of the country does not allow any civilian the possession of illegal firearms, whether herdsmen or farmers.”