Pressured by gun control activists in the wake of the Parkland, Florida, mass shooting, major corporations are now taking steps to distance themselves from the National Rifle Association, cutting ties and breaking contracts to provide discounts and amenities to NRA members.

The business decision may not be a smart one; the NRA has more than five million members, nearly all of whom are law-abiding citizens who own their guns legally, or people who simply belong to the organization out of support for Constitutional rights. But spurred on by celebrities and activists convinced that the NRA is murdering thousands each year, companies seem to believe they've got the right idea in dropping the gun rights organization.

So here's the official list of who has made a public point to end their connection with the NRA.

Delta Airlines: The company Tweeted on Friday that they'd like to be "removed" from the NRA website, and that they'll no longer offer group discounts for NRA members (the discounts weren't that great, anyway).

United Airlines: Previously, the company had provided NRA members a group discount if they booked travel through United to the NRA's annual convention. They won't be offering that discount any longer.

Rental Cars: Most rental car companies offer corporate and group discounts to people who are members of professional organizations like Bar Associations. Hertz offered that discount to NRA members, but says they're working to discontinue it, and it will be deactivated soon. Enterprise, Alamo, Avis, Budget, and National have also said they will no longer be offering discounts to NRA members.

You can get discount codes for all of these rental companies elsewhere, if you're still inclined to rent a car.

Wyndham and Best Western Hotels: Both Wyndham and Best Western had cut their ties with the NRA before the Parkland incident, but both reiterated, in the mass shooting's wake, that they were no longer corporate partners of the NRA. Best Western dropped the NRA after Sandy Hook, and Wyndham ended its discount for NRA members last year in response to a planned boycott.

Republic Bank and First National Bank of Omaha: Republic makes a pre-paid debit card with the NRA logo. They said Friday, “The NRA Prepaid Card program was previously under review. Upon conclusion of this review, we decided to discontinue the offering." Until last Friday, when they were threatened with a boycott, First National offered an NRA-branded credit card.

Allied Van Lines: According to Business Insider, Allied Van Lines is ending its discount program for NRA members, telling the news outlet in a statement, "We have asked [the NRA] to remove our listing from their benefits site."

MetLife: The insurance company says it will no longer offer its services through the NRA website, and will end its discount program for NRA members. “We value all our customers but have decided to end our discount program with the NRA,” they said in a statement.

Chubb Insurance: Chubb Ltd. was the underwriter for an NRA-branded life insurance policy program called "NRA Carry Guard." The company told Reuters that they will be ending their contract with the gun rights association shortly.

Paramount Rx: If you don't have prescription drug coverage through your health insurance or Medicare, Paramount Rx offers a "group rate" on certain prescriptions. They will no longer allow the NRA to be part of that group rate program. "The prescription discount program that is made available to NRA members is offered through a third-party vendor. We are working with that vendor to discontinue the program and remove the offering," they said Friday.

Starkey Health Technologies: The hearing aid company said on Twitter this weekend that it would no longer offer cheaper hearing aids to NRA members as part of a partner discount program.

All of these programs ended in response to a planned boycott, led by gun control activists. The idea for a boycott made the rounds on Twitter late last week, and companies were eager to curry favor with groups like Everytown for Gun Safety, and the March For Our Lives.

Some companies have not responded to calls for a boycott, but are still facing pressure. Amazon, specifically, is under fire for hosting NRAtv, an online channel available to Amazon Prime members that features NRA-branded content. Gun control activists are also targeting FedEx, though the company has yet to announce any change in policy.