Immigration reform is dead. Again.

Despite bipartisan agreement on many issues, the U.S. Senate rejected four separate bills, two of which didn't even get to a vote. None of the bills garnered 60 votes, which is needed for passage.

The White House was furious, especially at Senate Democratic Leader Chuck Schumer of New York.

"The Schumer Democrats in the Senate demonstrated again that they are not serious about DACA, they are not serious about immigration reform, and they are not serious about homeland security. They filibustered a proposal with an extremely generous path to citizenship because it also contained reforms that secured our border and secured our immigration system," White House Press Secretary Sarah Sander said in a statement.

"The Grassley bill was a compromise bill — as demonstrated by the fact that some conservatives opposed its very generous DACA provisions. Yet, the Schumer Democrats chose to filibuster it because they are held hostage by the radical left in their party, which opposes any immigration control at all. Today, they sided with an extreme fringe over the hardworking men and women of the Department of Homeland Security.

"The Administration will continue advocating for an immigration package that includes border security, ending chain migration, cancelling the visa lottery, and a reasonable DACA solution — a proposal Americans support overwhelmingly. And while radical Schumer Democrats align themselves with the open border fringe, the Trump Administration will continue advocating for the American people," Sanders said in the statement.

For the record, the White House is not the only place unhappy with Schumer. His approval rating is at it’s lowest point since 1999 among New York voters, according to a Quinnipiac University poll released on Thursday.

"The poll found that 35 percent of New York voters do not approve of the job that Schumer is doing in the Senate, while 53 percent of voters approve," NTK Network reported. "This is the lowest approval rating that Schumer has received from New York voters since he was first elected to the United States Senate in 1999."

The plans that died, as reported by The Daily Wire, were:

Sen. John McCain's (R-AZ) and Sen. Chris Coons' (D-DE) bill — touted as a "moderate" reform measure — never made it out of debate. The Senate was unable to reach the 60-vote threshold to invoke cloture on a deal that would have given "conditional permanent residence to recipients of the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals immigration program," in return for a paltry $110 million annual grant for increased border security. The grant specifically excluded any funding for construction of a wall on the Southern border.

Sen. Pat Toomey's (R-PA) proposal that the United States cut off funding for "sanctuary cities" and "sanctuary states" like California, until those cities and states agreed to share current information with federal immigration authorities, also failed to make it to the floor. Fifty-four senators voted to put that bill to a full Senate vote, but Toomey was unable to secure any bipartisan support for his measure, and it died in debate.

The final two proposals were dueling agreements on both DACA and the border wall — one from the White House and one from a small group of "Common Sense" moderate senators led by Sen. Angus King (I-ME) and Republican Sen. Mike Rounds (SD). Although the bill, which traded a "path to citizenship" for DACA recipients for border enforcement (and even $25 billion for "southern border security construction projects") but included a conditional amnesty for DACA parents, was popular among members of both parties, only 54 Senators ultimately voted for the bill.