Here are four beautiful and profound sayings/quotes that progressivism has destroyed over the last few decades:

1) “Sticks and stones will break my bones but words will never hurt me.”

Ah, the once-classic children’s rhyme meant to “persuade the child victim of name calling to ignore the taunt, refrain from physical retaliation and to remain calm and good natured.” states that the earliest citation of this is from an 1862 publication of the Christian Recorder from the African Methodist Episcopal Church. It was presented there as an “old adage,” suggesting that the aphorism even predated such publication.

This proverb is an immensely powerful one. It creates a distinction between controllable and uncontrollable pain. You cannot control whether a stick or a stone breaks your bones but you can, in fact, control whether certain words can have power over you. You cannot choose to not have your bone break when someone hits you with a stick or a stone but you definitely can choose to have words not affect you.

The simple but profound aphorism, once installed into every young brain, has since been adjusted to, “Sticks and stones will break my bones, and words will hurt me so much that I need a safe space,” or, “If your words hurt me, it’s justified to break your bones with sticks and stones.”

2) "There’s no such thing as a free lunch."

This wise saying tells us that no matter what goods or services are being provided under the guise of “free (insert good or service here),” someone somewhere is going to be paying for it. But did you know that understanding the origin of this adage not only undermines most modern progressive positions, it actually makes a case for capitalism?

According to, the origin of this saying dates back to the mid-19th century when saloon owners gave free lunches to anyone who bought a drink. Why did they do this? So they could attract customers. Yes, even this lunch wasn’t free, because the saloon was covering the cost. But the difference was that these saloons were willing to dole out free lunches to customers if they bought a drink simply because it was good for their business. Even if it wasn’t good for their business, it was the individual saloon that incurred the financial burden, not the taxpayers.

3) "I have a dream that my four little children will one day live in a nation where they will not be judged by the color of their skin, but by the content of their character."

Identity politics is a cancer that has unfortunately permeated the world. Needless to say, Dr. King would be disappointed in the Left’s regression regarding racial politics. Whether it’s some campus SJW trying to discredit an argument because a white person said it, or some Richard Spencer enthusiast advocating for a white ethno-state (in reaction to leftist identity politics), it’s hard to go one day without race being placed at the forefront of, well, everything. Yes, that includes sports. Anyone not living under a rock knows that! But did you also know it also includes vacations and, get this . . . tipping your waiter? Under Jim Crow, we had blacks and whites living in separate university dorms and having separate graduations. On college campuses in 2018, we have blacks and whites living separately in university dorms and having separate graduations. Need I say any more?

4) "Ask not what your country can do for you, but what you can do for your country."

Here’s an interesting experiment: Go to your nearest college campus, present this quote to students, and then ask them whether a Democrat or Republican first said it. It’s likely that most will say a Republican said it. In fact, you’d probably get a handful that called it, racist or xenophobic . . . somehow. Of course, a Republican didn’t first say this quote; it was John F. Kennedy — a Democrat.

If today’s Democrats could get their hands on this quote and do what they want with it, it would probably be changed to “Ask not what you can do for your country, but what your country can do for you.”

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