Mayon volcano began spewing lava on Monday, leading to the evacuation of over 3,000 people living on the Philippines' main island of Luzon as ash fell from the sky.

After steam began to rise from the summit and trails of lava began pouring down the volcano's side, the Philippine Institute of Volcanology and Seismology (PHIVOLCS) and authorities announced that the volcano had reached "level 3” status, according to a CNN report.

Citizens in the towns of Barangay Anoling, Daraga, Barangays Sua, Quirangay, Tumpa, Ilawod and Salugan of Camalig and in Barangays Tandarora, Maninila, and Travesia in Guinobatan reported ash in the air moments after.

PHIVOLCS noted in an alert that the ash along with several rockfalls indicated an "increased tendency towards hazardous eruption," adding that a "bright crater glow" coming from Mayon indicates "the growth of a new lava dome and beginnings of lava flow towards the southern slopes.”

The institute advised the creation of a 7-mile danger zone perimeter around the affected areas and instructed pilots to avoid flying in the region so the ash would not cause any danger to aircraft.

Mayon is one of the world’s most active volcanoes, erupting 47 times over the last four hundred years. In 2014, the residents on the island of Luzon were ordered to evacuate after the volcano reached "critical alert" status.

PHIVOLCS Director Renato Solidum stated that while conditions were similar to Mayon’s last eruption, they may not necessarily lead to one.

"Sometimes this eruption activity need not really result (in) very explosive eruptions," he told CNN. "Sometimes it would result (in) non-explosive eruptions where lava would ooze out of the crater, but not explode."

The National Disaster Risk Reduction and Coordinating Council (NDRRMC) reported that over 900 families on the island of Luzon have been evacuated from the vicinity of the volcano.

On Tuesday, the province of Albay declared a state of emergency after lava flows were detected nearly four miles from the region.