After members of a 69-year-old Colorado man’s family reported to police that they could not contact him on December 28, police searched the man’s home where he lived with his daughter, and noticed a terrible stench. But it wasn’t until January 10 that police executed a search warrant at the house and found the man’s body — encased in concrete in a crawl space.

Dayna Michele Jennings, 43, the daughter of William Mussack, the murdered man, has been charged with first-degree murder, according to Adams County authorities.

Jennings has confessed to the murder.

After the family had contacted police on December 28, Jennings told police she hadn’t seen her father in weeks and he no longer lived at the home. She insisted he had left for the mountains with his girlfriend. The next day, a Federal Heights police officer searched the home, smelling the terrible stench. On December 30, the officer returned and noticed the absence of construction materials that had been stacked on the driveway the day before. Jennings would not let the officer search the home.

Mussack’s girlfriend told police she had not seen him since December 8. When police interviewed a man named John Cappadocia, he said Jennings told him on December 23 that she had seen her father a few days before, when he stopped by to retrieve his cellphone. The Denver Post reported:

But pings on cellphone towers indicated the cellphone was still near the house, the arrest affidavit said. Several relatives had been trying to reach Mussack, including his son, Brian Mussack, who lives in California. Brian Mussack told police that his father told him in a phone call that after Jennings gave him a back rub on Dec. 7 he had felt like he had been drugged and slept for 15 hours in his recliner. Family said he was normally up at the crack of dawn.

On January 5, Jennings saw Cappadocia again, informing him that her father was in Arizona; family members told police Mussack had no contacts in Arizona.

DA Investigator Patrick Ness discovered that Mussack’s bank account had unusual activity in December; a check to Jennings was apparently signed by Mussack, but the signature did not match Mussack’s prior signatures.