One Cincinnati-area youth basketball team will no longer be able to sport their special-order jerseys; in fact, they won't be playing at all. In the fourth week of the league's season, the "Wet Dream Team" got pulled off the court and soon informed that their season was officially over.

While the sexually charged name of the team, which appeared on the front of their jerseys, was probably enough to get them in trouble with the league, what got them suspended indefinitely were the racially charged names they gave themselves on the back of the jerseys. Yahoo Sports reports:

Four weeks into the Cincinnati Premier Youth Basketball League’s season, parents of players on a team from West Clermont, Ohio, saw that the team from Kings Mills, Ohio, against whom their children were playing was named “The Wet Dream Team.” They also noticed that the names on the backs of the high-school-aged boys’ jerseys included phrases like “Knee Grow” and “Coon.”

Here is a screenshot of a Facebook post showing two of the jerseys:

After West Clermont parent Tony Rue complained, a representative for the team spoke with officials before the start of the second quarter. The referees quickly canceled the game, while officials reportedly kept the two teams separated until they left the gym.

The Cincinnati Enquirer, which first reported the story, spoke with some of the parents and officials involved. Several parents expressed shock that the jerseys were ever created in the first place, not to mention that it took over three weeks for someone to finally pull the plug on the sexually and racially charged stunt.

"This isn’t a typo, this isn’t a mistake, these are ideas that were thought of, discussed, agreed upon by adults and kids alike, printed on uniforms, social media accounts registered and manned and no one thought this was a bad idea or inappropriate?" wrote Rue in a lengthy Facebook post (excerpt below).

A spokesperson for the Kings Local School District issued a statement Monday night published by the Enquirer condemning the "inappropriate conduct" of the team and announcing that the team "has been restricted from any further use of district facilities." The Cincinnati Premier Youth Basketball League likewise provided a statement saying that the team was officially "dismissed from our league."

Walt Gill, the coach of the banned team, issued his own statement apologizing "to anyone that was offended by the jerseys" and noting that they offered to cover them up.

Meanwhile, the local chapter of the NAACP is getting involved, calling it a "teachable moment" and saying they plan to talk with league officials, Yahoo notes.

Here's an excerpt from the Facebook post by Rue that brought attention to the jersey debacle online:

A Rec league or not, please explain how this is even remotely considered appropriate for a high school basketball game. From a team name referencing sexual conduct to offensive and racist nicknames. It was so inappropriate that the coaches of the girls teams that played before us quickly ushered the girls out of the gym so they wouldn’t have to see it. By no means are we perfect parents or assume our teenage boys are innocent and don’t speak of things like this, but I could never imagine allowing my teenage son to represent his school and league in this manner, let alone representing our family with such filth. While I applaud the representatives of the WCYBA league, I strongly question the judgment and character of the parents and league reps for Kings.

“Wet Dream Team" "Knee Grow(Negro)" "Coon(Another racial slur, and no your real name being Kuhn doesn’t make it any better.)" and "Dirp Dirp" just to name a few. Could you imagine being an African American high school kid and seeing these things on the jerseys of the team you are playing and how uncomfortable and unsafe they would feel?? Then a team page, again representing Kings League, with vulgar language. Beyond disrespectful. There is enough hate, bullying, and aggressive behavior in the world that these kids, parents, and schools shouldn’t have to deal with bigotry and lewd innuendos on jerseys and in team names in a school district represented recreational basketball league. This isn’t a typo, this isn’t a mistake, these are ideas that were thought of, discussed, agreed upon by adults and kids alike, printed on uniforms, social media accounts registered and manned and no one thought this was a bad idea or inappropriate?