On Monday, Sen. Kirsten Gillibrand, ostensibly in effort to get out in front of other potential 2020 Democratic Presidential nominees, called for President Donald Trump to resign amid resurfaced allegations that Trump had harassed four women during his time as a New York real estate developer.

The allegations were not new, and Gillibrand, who was reticent to call on Sen. Al Franken to resign until after nearly a dozen women came forward alleging inappropriate behavior on Franken's part, seemed to seize, quite cynically, on the opportunity to raise funds — and her profile — through a Quixotic crusade.

Tuesday morning, Trump fell for Gillibrand's bait (hook, line, and sinker) Tweeting a series of allegations, including that Gillibrand solicited donations from the Trump family during her initial run for Senate in New York.

According to Open Secrets, Gillibrand raised money from the Trump family as recently as 2014, when Ivanka Trump donated to Gillibrand's re-election campaign (at the time, of course, the family was still mostly Democratic donors). The gist of the Tweet, however, is that Gillibrand retains connections to the Clinton family, and that she was willing to overlook well-known information about Trump in order to obtain cash for her operation.

Harsh, but a fairly routine insult from the Twitter President.

Gillibrand, of course, seized on the opportunity to fire back.

She also mentioned, quite casually, to the Washington Post and other media that she received Trump's Tweet while she was in a "bipartisan Bible study," for extra effect.

Given Trump's penchant for Twitter spats, the back-and-forth seems rather routine, if largely to Gillibrand's benefit. Certainly, others like Rep. Kamala Harris and Sen. Cory Booker, can only wish to be granted such an honor as to make the President's priority social media list; after all, it positions Gillibrand as a foil to Trump. There's no chance Trump will resign over yesterday's re-revelations, so she can harp on the subject for the next two years.

The remarkable part of the exchange is who decided to pile on in an effort to jump on Gillibrand's bandwagon. MSNBC's "Morning Joe" lost their collective mind over what they considered to be a "sexually suggestive" Tweet on the part of the President (apparently, because the President said Gillibrand would "do anything" for a campaign contribution).

The accusation was then repeated by feminists and activists on Twitter, until it made it around to Sen. Elizabeth Warren, who took the dialed the accusation of sexual harassment up a notch, claiming that not only did Trump impugn Gillibrand's good name, but that he, in fact, "slut-shamed" the Senator, as well.

If you can figure out what part of Trump's Tweet slut-shames Sen. Gillibrand you are, in fact, doing better than we are. Unless Warren is actually implying Gillibrand would truly "do anything," which, in itself, might actually be sexual harassment.