On Thursday, CNN speculated that perhaps President Trump had slurred his speech during his monumental announcement that the United States would move its embassy to Jerusalem and recognize Jerusalem as Israel’s capital. They ran a piece titled, “Did President Trump slur his speech?”

Here’s CNN’s report:

Toward the end of the news conference, some on Twitter and Facebook noted that the President's usual speech pattern changed and that he started to slur his words — and they speculated about what it could mean. … People can slur their words for any number of reasons. It can be a sign of problems with a nervous system disorder like a brain tumor or a stroke. People who have cerebral palsy or Guillain-Barré Syndrome can struggle with slurring. Multiple sclerosis, muscular dystrophy, Lyme disease, Huntington's, Myasthenia gravis, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, Parkinson's and Wilson's disease all can cause it. Dental work — such as ill-fitting dentures — can also be blamed. Medication can impact speech, as can drugs and alcohol. Or people can simply slur their words when they get tired.

So, it is now fine to speculate on the health of presidents. That’s funny considering that just a few months ago, the media tut-tutted anyone who would question the status of Hillary Clinton’s health. Here, for example, is CNN: “The new birthers: Debunking the Hillary Clinton health conspiracy.” They explained:

Much in the way "birthers" (Trump was among the most prominent) sought similar ends by questioning President Barack Obama's citizenship, the "healthers" are using junk science and conspiracy theories to argue that Clinton is suffering from a series of debilitating brain injuries.

There were similar articles in The Atlantic, Vox.com, The Washington Post, NPR, and a myriad of other outlets.

Many of those articles were written after Hillary collapsed into the back of a van on 9/11. She later claimed that she suffered from dehydration before admitting that she had pneumonia.

Now that a Republican is a target of speculation, however, fulsome explanations of slurred speech pulled directly from WebMD.com pass for journalism.