In an off-script story that was so "uncomfortable" that it ended up getting edited out of the initial broadcast of the awards show, Russell Crowe described the difficulties of performing in a wild sex scene from one of his early movies in which he was depicted as "sodomizing" his co-star.

While the official broadcast of Crowe's speech at the 7th annual Australian Academy of Cinema and Television Arts Awards on Wednesday night ended up cutting out Crowe's partly humorous, partly cringe-worthy story, that didn't prevent it from making headlines.

Crowe told the story as an illustration of how important "sensitivity" is in the film industry, particularly for actors. Back in 1992 in a scene for one of his first feature films, "Romper Stomper," Crowe described just how complicated things got when he was being filmed "sodomizing Jacqui McKenzie."

"I didn't actually intend to do that — I was trying to keep my bits away from her bits, and she's been given one of those pieces of elastic that the girls get when you do those scenes, which protects them from all things, and my bits and pieces were in a little canvas sack with a drawstring," said Crowe, amid hesitant laughter.

"And it wasn’t (sic) actually my desire to keep the bits apart," he continued. "It wasn’t until the opening night of the film that it was pointed out by none other than Jacqui McKenzie’s beautiful late mother that we were in fact, in her mind, engaged in sodomy."

Realizing he needed to move on, and fast, Crowe said, "Anyway, that was just a story about sensitivity!"

As Yahoo Movies UK notes, McKenzie later posted her own account of the "uncomfortable" scene in a Facebook post, but stressed that the experience "bares no relevance" to the "very important conversation of sexual harassment in the workplace."

"Russell was reflecting on the indignities of shooting a particular scene, in the R-rated indie film Romper Stomper," she wrote. "Over the eons, he and I have often laughed at the awkwardness we felt shooting that scene. How we were trying to be as protective of our modesties as we could, as 'sensitive' to each other's feelings as we could BUT when the director called 'action', the scripted action was violent and explicit. We were both new to the industry at the time- it was my first film- and, yes, it was uncomfortable. For everyone. Scenes like that always are. Also for family and friends when they later watch the work on the big screen."

Below is the full text of McKenzie's post:

Re: AACTAs last night and Russell’s brevity;

There were no blurry lines on that awkward day’s filming back in 1991!!!

I wanted to post something earlier on the matter but I have been attending my first ever mammogram at Breast Screen Australia: ladies get yourselves checked! It’s a free service and they are amazing!

For anyone interested:

Russell was reflecting on the indignities of shooting a particular scene, in the R-rated indie film Romper Stomper. Over the eons, he and I have often laughed at the awkwardness we felt shooting that scene. How we were trying to be as protective of our modesties as we could, as ‘sensitive’ to each other’s feelings as we could BUT when the director called ‘action’, the scripted action was violent and explicit. We were both new to the industry at the time- it was my first film- and, yes, it was uncomfortable. For everyone. Scenes like that always are. Also for family and friends when they later watch the work on the big screen.

The very important conversation of sexual harassment in the workplace bares no relevance to this. There were no blurry lines on that awkward day back in 1991. As there should never be. Geoffrey Wright, the wardrobe department and the crew dealt ‘sensitively’ with the both of us as we all navigated a confronting scene in an extraordinary breakout film that won awards all over the world.

The irony -what we actors are asked to do in scenes and how we actually film them- is what we laugh at. Then and now.