Hillary Clinton has routinely insisted that she had no idea Harvey Weinstin was an alleged sexual harasser (and even an alleged rapist) when she was cashing his six-figure checks for her presidential campaign, but a report from The New York Times Wednesday seems to indicate that Clinton was well aware of Weinstein's antics.

She found out about them from, of all people, Lena Dunham.

Dunham told the Times that she approached Hillary's deputy communications manager, Kristina Schake, after finding out about Harvey's involvement in a Clinton-related SuperPAC, and about his role in a New York City joint fundraiser for Clinton and the DNC. Duhnam couldn't provide concrete evidence, but warned Clinton's operation that she'd heard "rumors" from several women she'd worked with.

“I just want you to let you know that Harvey’s a rapist and this is going to come out at some point,” Dunham claims she told Schake. “I think it’s a really bad idea for him to host fund-raisers and be involved because it’s an open secret in Hollywood that he has a problem with sexual assault.”

Dunham says Schake told her she'd relay the message to Robby Mook, but that she was "surprised" by the allegations. The campaign appeared to ignore her warning, Dunham said.

Hillary Clinton went on to take more than $30,000 from Weinstein for her campaign — and that doesn't count the millions the Hollywood mega-producer bundled for both her and her Democratic colleagues.

Clinton, through a communications director, Nick Merrill, told the Times that she was "shocked and appalled" at the Weinstein revelations (so "shocked and appalled" she was stunned into five full days of silence after the first allegations against Weinstein emerged). Schake and other Clinton campaign members tried to play off Dunham's warning to the Times as unimportant, telling the paper that Dunham never said anything about Harvey Weinstein's alleged rapes.

Of course, Dunham may have her own reasons for making public comments about the Weinstein case. She's currently recovering from a social media backlash that followed a statement she made supporting one of her "Girls" co-writers against allegations of sexual harassment, defying her own edict to always believe accusers. But Dunham was also very attached to Clinton, and had to spend weeks clearing her mind on retreat in Sedona, Arizona, talking to rocks as therapy when Clinton lost the election.