A top FBI agent on special counsel Robert S. Mueller's team investigating President Trump was removed this summer after the Justice Department’s inspector probed whether the agent sent text messages that expressed anti-Trump sentiments.

And yet neither the FBI nor Mueller said a word about the serious allegations.

The agent, Peter Strzok, was considered a top FBI counterintelligence investigator, the New York Times reported. Coincidentally, he helped lead the investigation into whether Hillary Clinton illegally sent classified information on her private email account. After Hillary was cleared in that probe, Mueller tapped him for a top role in the investigation into possible collusion between Trump’s campaign and Russia.

"But Mr. Strzok was reassigned this summer from Mr. Mueller’s investigation to the F.B.I.’s human resources department, where he has been stationed since. The people briefed on the case said the transfer followed the discovery of text messages in which Mr. Strzok and a colleague reacted to news events, like presidential debates, in ways that could appear critical of Mr. Trump," the Times reported.

Strzok was instrumental in the FBI's interview with Clinton on July 2, 2016 — just days before then-FBI Director James Comey announced he would not move forward with a prosecution of Clinton.

In yet another odd coincidence, Strzok was also a "key figure in the chain of events when the bureau, in 2016, received the infamous anti-Trump 'dossier' and launched a counterintelligence investigation into Russian meddling in the election that ultimately came to encompass FISA surveillance of a Trump campaign associate," Fox News reported.

The dossier was a compilation of rumors and lies about Trump put together by an opposition research team contracted by Democrats called Fusion GPS. Fusion's records, obtained by House investigators, show the dossier was funded by the Clinton campaign and the Democratic National Committee.

Trump is clearly miffed by all the recent revelations, posting on Twitter Sunday morning:

House Intelligence Committee Chairman Devin Nunes (R-CA) is even more furious. He has now officially demanded documents from the Department of Justice and FBI to determine whether the dossier prompted the FBI to put a Trump campaign associate under foreign surveillance.

"Strzok himself briefed the committee on Dec. 5, 2016, the sources said, but within months of that session House Intelligence Committee investigators were contacted by an informant suggesting that there was 'documentary evidence' that Strzok was purportedly obstructing the House probe into the dossier," Fox reported.

Said Trump:

“We now know why Strzok was dismissed, why the FBI and DOJ refused to provide us this explanation, and at least one reason why they previously refused to make [FBI] Deputy Director [Andrew] McCabe available to the Committee for an interview,” Nunes said in a statement.

Both the Times and The Washington Post fear Trump will use the new revelations to assert that he's the subject of a witch hunt. "Among federal law enforcement officials, there is great concern that exposure of the texts they exchanged may be used by the president and his defenders to attack the credibility of the Mueller probe and the FBI more broadly," the Post reported. The Times said that "the existence of the text messages is likely to fuel claims by Mr. Trump that he is the target of a witch hunt."

But as Joseph Heller said in "Catch-22": “Just because you're paranoid doesn't mean they aren't after you.”