Continuing a day-long streak of sexual harassment-related firings Wednesday, National Public Radio announced that it has parted ways with its chief news editor after several of his female colleagues accused him of inappropriate behavior.

Three female journalists alleged that David Sweeney gave them unwanted attention. One claimed Sweeney gave her inappropriate gifts and made her feel "uncomfortable"; two others said that Sweeney kissed them without provocation.

NPR has been investigating the allegations against Sweeney for several weeks — all three claims emerged around the same time as claims against Harvey Weinstein first hit headlines — but made the decision to drop Sweeney from the media company's news program only this week.

In an email to staff, NPR's senior vice president of news, Christ Turpin, said that the company now wants to "move forward."

"David Sweeney is no longer on staff," Turin said. "This is a difficult time for our newsroom and I'm committed to supporting all of you as we move forward. I know you appreciate that there are some questions I cannot answer in keeping with our practice to not comment on personnel issues, but I will do my best to address those I can."

Senior managing editor Edith Chapin will take over Sweeney's role.

The news comes on a day where left-leaning media — and especially NPR — has been besieged by claims of sexual harassment.

NBC News correspondent and Today Show host Matt Lauer was fired Wednesday morning, apparently without a word to his colleagues, for an alleged incident that happened during the Rio summer Olympics (with more victims, allegedly, ready to come forward). NPR also booted one of its most famous names, Garrison Keillor, after the longtime Prairie Home Companion host was accused of touching a coworker inappropriately.

Details of the claim against Keillor have not been made public, but were serious enough to warrant removing "Prairie Home Companion" from NPR's archives.