A British reporter tried to ambush an American combat historian on gun control, and failed miserably at it.

Britain Channel 4 reporter Jon Snow immediately went after Armed American radio reporter Neil McCabe, a combat historian who deployed to Iraq with the Army for 15 months, asking if he was "proud" of the 13,338 people who died from gunshot wounds in a year.

Taken aback, McCabe at first said he wasn't sure how to answer that question, but then made it clear to Snow he would not be made into a victim.

"I'm a proud veteran of the war in Iraq and I'm proud of this country in every way you can possibly imagine but I don't know if I'm responsible for that statistic," McCabe said.

Snow then asked if McCabe was proud or ashamed of the statistic.

"I don't know if I'm ashamed or I don't know if I'm proud," McCabe said. "It happens, and in a free country these things happen. There's always going to be risks, there's always going to be situations. I do know that murders by guns have been falling for the last, at least, six years and I do know that a lot of Americans, like myself, feel no obligation to be a victim, and if this is a massacre after massacre country as your reporter described, I would prefer to be armed rather than disarmed."

Snow tried to ambush McCabe again by asking him if he was proud of the 137 gun deaths so far in 2016. McCabe wasn't having any of it.

"More people die by fists and kicks than by rifles, so I mean I don't know how you want to divide it," McCabe said. "People die, people are murdered, it's human nature, but in those situations there is no obligation to be a victim. I don't want to hide under a desk, I would rather have a gun to protect myself."

"I do know that murders by guns have been falling for the last, at least, six years and I do know that a lot of Americans, like myself, feel no obligation to be a victim, and if this is a massacre after massacre country as your reporter described, I would prefer to be armed rather than disarmed."

Neil McCabe

Snow pivoted to background checks, arguing that they would prevent the mentally ill from getting guns. McCabe rightly pointed out the failures of the current background check system.

"The idea that you have to ask permission to exercise a constitutional right strikes people as absurd and really un-American," McCabe said. "The second thing about background checks is that they are notoriously inaccurate. Of the two million purchases that have been blocked by background checks, something like 95 percent of them are false readings, so it's (an) absurd system and it should be thrown out."

Snow concluded the interview by pointing out that the gun death figure in 2016 had risen to 141, to which McCabe responded, "I don't celebrate those numbers as you seem to."

(h/t: The Blaze)