On Friday, the Republican governor of Alabama, Kay Ivey, told reporters that she will probably vote for Roy Moore despite having "no reason to disbelieve" the women who have accused the candidate of sexual abuse:

IVEY: I will cast my ballot on December the 12th, and I do believe that the nominee of the Party is the one I will vote for. I believe in the Republican party and what we stand for, and most important, we need to have a Republican in the United States Senate to vote on the things like Supreme Court Justices, other appointments that the Senate has to confirm and make major decisions. And so that's what I plan to do is vote for the Republican nominee, Roy Moore.

REPORTER: Governor, are you going to be proud of your vote for Roy Moore?

IVEY: Every Alabamian has a right and duty to vote to determine who their U.S. Senate person is going to be from Alabama, and yes I'm proud to vote, and I hope every Alabamian would be proud to cast their vote.

REPORTER: Do you believe any of the women who have brought accusations against Roy Moore?

IVEY: I certainly have no reason to disbelieve any of them. The timings little curious, but at the same time, I have no reason to disbelieve them.

Daily Wire Editor-in-Chief Ben Shapiro wrote about this type of decision-making in a November 4 piece for National Review:

Finally, there’s the third argument, which is the most honest and also the most morally horrifying: David Horowitz’s argument that Democrats are so disgusting that even if Moore did it, he wouldn’t care, because the Democrats must be stopped. This binary thinking would justify a vote for anyone who votes the right way on legislation; President Trump could have literally shot someone on Fifth Avenue, and Horowitz would have supported him. In this view, character doesn’t matter at all and we aren’t destroying the social fabric of the country when we prize policy outcomes over basic decency. In fact, the Horowitz angle holds that basic decency can be ensured only by desired policy outcomes: All that matters is politics.

Despite having "no reason to disbelieve" the women who have accused Roy Moore of sexual assault and harassment, Governor Ivey appears intent on voting for the candidate because she believes "we need to have a Republican in the United States Senate to vote on" important issues.

She also claims to "believe in the Republican party and what we stand for."

One has to wonder what exactly the Republican Party stands for if Governor Ivey has "no reason to disbelieve" the women, but will vote for Roy Moore regardless.