Wearing a brown jacket and shirt reminiscent of his wife’s wardrobe selection in the last Democratic debate, Bill Clinton switched out a pin usually displaying the American flag with a #Ready4Hillary logo. Those who followed the 2008 presidential campaigns might be reminded of then Senator Barack Obama’s pioneering use of similar branding, ushering in a new tradition of political messaging.

Delivering an erratic and disjointed speech in New Hampshire, Bill Clinton jumped back and forth between a wide variety of subjects, including but not limited to: drug abuse, job creation, national security, Muslims, illegal immigration, government-run health care and education, wind and solar energy, and restricting access to firearms. He sought to tie them together by speaking of “inclusive economics, politics, and society.”

Notably, Clinton toed the line of fellow Democrats and left-wingers in endorsing the anti-American “Black Lives Matter” movement.

“I see all these movements today that I like. I like all those young people in Black Lives Matter. I think what they’re saying is important,” said Clinton, receiving enthusiastic applause from his audience.

Hedging against anticipated criticisms of his endorsement of a movement that denigrates law enforcement as racist against blacks and Hispanics, Clinton then extended praise to the heroism of the San Bernardino police’s response to November’s Islamic terrorist attack. The former president’s praise, however, received virtually no applause.

Using euphemisms like “inclusive economics” to advocate for greater centralization of control and expanded governmental power, Clinton deployed sophistry to call for the writing off of student debt owed to the federal government. While Senator Bernie Sanders has called for “free” secondary education to be available to all, Hillary Clinton has called for a slightly-adjusted socialization of higher education - means-tested welfare subsidies for students.

Despite campaigning in assistance of his wife’s presidential ambitions since at least 2008, left-wing media dubbed Monday as Bill Clinton’s debut on his wife’s campaign trail. Just months ago, CNN joined the Clintons in producing hour-long campaign infomercials which were presented as new specials - in the same vein as online advertising is occasionally camouflaged in social media or on news and entertainment websites. CNN and the Clinton Global Initiative went so far as to produce a special set and animated graphic for the event.

Waxing economic, Bill Clinton called for a raising of the minimum wage.

“If you want to raise wages, and reduce income inequality,” Clinton advised, “you have to create more jobs and more businesses in areas that have a good growth projection.” His wife’s plan, conveniently, does just that.

Absent from Bill Clinton’s speech was any mention of Donald Trump.

No mention was made of addressing Islamic terrorism, labor-force participation at a 38-year-low, the nearly $19 trillion federal debt, border security to halt the flow of illegal immigrants into the country, preserving constitutional protections against state encroachment, or reducing the scope and size of any dimension of government.