A man learned the hard way this week that the Secret Service won't hold back, even if you're trying to boost your way to YouTube stardom by jumping the White House fence.

On Tuesday, an unemployed 36-year-old (yes, 36) man dressed up as Pikachu and set up a series of web cameras just outside the White House fence facing Pennsylvania Avenue, according to The Washington Post.

After doing what authorities only describe as a "type of dance," Curtis Combs dropped a backpack on the ground and then attempted to scale a concrete barrier and run onto the White House lawn. Secret Service, not ones to indulge the stardom fantasies of middle-aged Pokemon cosplayers, nabbed Combs as soon as his feet touched solid ground on the White House side of the barrier.

The Secret Service was understandably mum on whether they had to use an "ultra ball," or whether a regular Pokeball sufficed to nab poor Pikachu.

According to court papers filed just yesterday, Combs told authorities that he intended the President no harm; he just "“wanted to become famous." He also told the Secret Service that he knew all along that he'd be arrested, but was hoping to do a short "pre-jump ritual" for his audience before he jumped the barrier, and before law enforcement tackled him to the ground.

Sadly, the Secret Service moved too quickly to intercept the rogue Pokemon, so Combs was forced to just drop his bag and go for it. Authorities detained Combs for several hours while they searched his backpack and his Pokemon costume. Combs will face a misdemeanor federal charge of unlawful entry.

By the way, Combs never did give authorities a reason as to why he chose to dress as a Pokemon, but it's an odd selection, particularly given that Combs isn't even the first Pikachu to ever scale the White House fence and end up in the slammer. Back in 2014, a man dressed in a Pikachu novelty hat and carrying a Pikachu toy, attempted to jump a similar barrier during a Code Pink anti-war protest.