In a Sunday-aired interview with Hillary Clinton, CNN’s Fareed Zakaria suggested that the political opinions of "white women" in America are primarily motivated by two considerations: race and sex.

"You lost the white women vote. Do you think white women in America voted their race over their gender?" asked Zakaria, framing the demographic group as politically homogenous.

Clinton seemingly accepted Zakaria’s premise, suggesting that sexual solidarity is not a politically unifying force among women the way that race is among minorities who support Democrats:

I do think that gender has not become a political mobilizing factor the way that race has, and the way that I think President Obama almost transcended it, and, you know, was able to be elected twice. I think that gender is still a challenge in the political arena.

In September, Clinton likewise described Obama as having cultivated racial solidarity among minorities for political support in a way she could not do among women. She also broadly indicted America as characterized by "sexism [against women] and misogyny."

Clinton derided American society as hateful of women without objection from Zakaria, portraying her sex as a political liability:

Earlier in the interview, Zakaria described Clinton as a "pioneer for women's rights."


Two days before last year’s presidential election, Zakaria implored his viewers to vote for Clinton while describing himself as politically balanced: “I am not a highly partisan person. I have views that are left of center, but others that are conservative."

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