Nearly a week after the story first broke, former Presidential candidate Hillary Clinton has finally released a statement about the allegations against Hollywood producer — and big-money campaign donor — Harvey Weinstein.

But although Clinton had plenty of time to consider her thoughts on the matter, her message for Weinstein's victims is short and sweet - barely three sentences long.

Clinton says she was "shocked and appalled" to learn of the allegations, and paid homage to the women who have come forward to accuse Weinstein of sexual assault, lauding them for their "courage" and their "support of others."

"The behavior described by women coming forward cannot be tolerated," Clinton says.

While the sentiment is certainly nice, particularly coming from the woman who, during the 2016 Presidential campaign, practically declared herself the de facto spokesperson for everyone in America of the female persuasion, Clinton's short-and-sweet message leaves plenty of questions — namely whether the New York Democrat intends to do anything about the thousands Weinstein gave to her campaign, and the millions he bundled.

Clinton was Weinstein's top donations recipient, netting nearly $20,000 from the Hollywood producer over the years — just a tiny bit more than New York Senator Chuck Schumer. Weinstein has been a big supporter of all things Clinton, beginning with Bill Clinton's re-election campaign in the late 1990s, and continuing through Hillary's abortive 2016 attempt at the Oval Office.

It's also not clear why Clinton waited so long to say anything. Although the accusations against Weinstein remain exactly that — accusations — the list of victims now includes a bevy of Hollywood actresses, and at least three women who say Weinstein didn't just expose himself. He raped them. Even if Clinton was waiting for more concerete allegations, she likely had enough evidence of Weinstein's misbehavior by Monday morning to speak out.

This statement, today, was, quite literally, the least Clinton could do.