Some schools in Britain are no longer going to use B.C. and A.D. — Before Christ, and Anno Domini, which means "in the year of the Lord" — because they're afraid of offending non-Christians.

Instead, during religious education lessons, the new terms will be B.C.E. — or "Before Common Era" — and C.E., which stands for "Common Era."

"Local authority committees drawing up religious education syllabuses say the old terms may upset minorities or non-believers," the Daily Mail reported.

But as it often turns out, many of the so-called offended said they were anything but. Muslim and Jewish leaders were mystified, saying they were not offended by the familiar terms, the Mail wrote.

Meanwhile, former Archbishop of Canterbury Lord Carey said ditching the old terms is a "great shame."

Lord Carey said: "I have never met a Muslim or Jewish leader who is offended by the Gregorian calendar" while leading Imam Ibrahim Mogra said: "I don’t believe it causes Muslims offence." A spokesman for the Board of Deputies of British Jews said: "I don’t think anyone would mind if in mainstream schools they use BC and AD."

So far, local authority committees in Brighton, Essex and others have moved to do away with B.C. and A.D. The syllabus for schools in East Sussex, for example, reads: "BCE and CE are now used in order to show sensitivity to those who are not Christians," the Mail wrote.

But Chris McGovern, the chairman of the Campaign for Real Education, told the Mail that removing B.C. and A.D. "is a capitulation to political correctness."