British Labour leader Jeremy Corbyn has long been a supporter of the Bolivarian revolution. He’s made no secret of the fact that his lifelong dream of socioeconomic upheaval would be complete if the Chavismo model were fully implemented in the United Kingdom. While other populist leftists (who have expressed prior support for Chavez) shy away from openly endorsing autocratic President Nicolas Maduro and his strongman tactics, Corbyn is doubling-down on solidarity with the caudillo. To Corbyn, the people, not the oppressive socialist government, are to blame for the current tragedy in Venezuela.

As protesters take to the streets of Caracas to demand a new future, spilling blood, sweat, and tears in the hope that their children and their children’s children can perhaps avoid a government-scripted life of poverty, squalor, starvation, and despair, Corbyn appears to be siding with the security forces ordered to maintain the status-quo at all costs.

In a statement released from his cushy and safe home in the capitalist West, Corbyn spits in the faces of desperate Venezuelan protesters to lament the supposedly martyred “security forces that have been killed by people on the streets.” Read:

Guided by moral relativism, Corbyn condemns “violence” in a general sense — a common tactic used by American leftists on college campuses to deflect from the issue at hand and avoid difficult introspection about misbehavior in their own ranks.

Corbyn’s pro-regime statement shouldn’t be surprising.

It’s important to recognize just how radical the Labour leader actually is. The man makes Bernie Sanders look like Ronald Reagan. There is no analog for Corbyn in the United States. He’s in a league of his own.

Even The New York Times’ Roger Cohen, who penned a deranged op-ed supporting Corbyn (simply because he’s less friendly with President Trump than Theresa May is — yes, Trump Derangement Syndrome is real), says that the Labour leader’s anti-Americanism, his long flirtation with Hamas, his coterie’s clueless leftover Marxism and anti-Zionism, his NATO bashing, his unworkable tax-and-spend promises, are all highly troubling. “He’s of that awful Cold War left that actually believed Soviet Moscow was probably not as bad as Washington,” confesses Cohen.