Rep. Keith Ellison (D-MN) was so excited that the city of Minneapolis raised its minimum wage to $15 an hour he tweeted out a video of him performing a song to celebrate. His performance was awful, to say the least.

The video begins with Ellison strumming a guitar and having a brief back-and-forth with someone named Isaiah about the $15 minimum wage news. Then the agonizing music began.

Here are the full lyrics to the song:

I've been marching for my 15, getting paid now that's what I mean.

I need money. That's what I want, yeah yeah.

I need money. That's what I want.

The best things are life for free, but you can give them to the birds and the bees.

I need money. That's what I want, yeah.

I need money. That's what I want.

As he continued to strum the guitar, Ellison resorted to simply speaking, stating: "$15 would do. We gotta get paid y'all, thanks to marching thanks to the city council."

Ellison proceeded to set down his guitar and exclaim his joy over the city council's move.

"$15! That's awesome," Ellison said. "I'm so proud of you guys, you keep it up. We're gonna fight here in Washington, you guys are fighting there in Minneapolis, we're fighting all over the country so the American people can get a raise. Thank you very much for your struggle."

"It's awesome, now let's go get it.

Ellison's song was roundly mocked:

Ellison seems to have missed the study that came out on Monday concluding that Seattle raising its minimum wage to $13 lowered hours by 9% and wagesoverall by $125 per month on average.

It's a matter of basic economics: wages are the cost of labor. If the cost of labor artificially increases, the business, particularly if it's in the restaurant industry, will have to offset those costs elsewhere. In the case of Seattle, they simply reduced the hours of their employees, thus resulting in less take-home pay for those workers.

It may make for a cute soundbite to say that a $15 minimum wage will give the American people a raise, but such a minimum wage will only be detrimental to American workers. Ellison's song was celebrating an economically detrimental policy.

The full video of Ellison can be seen below:

H/T: Twitchy

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