During Tuesday's White House press briefing, Press Secretary Sean Spicer said that Adolf Hitler did not use chemical weapons on his own people, apparently forgetting about that whole Holocaust thing.

"You had someone as despicable as Hitler who didn’t even sink to using chemical weapons," said Spicer, explaining why President Trump took action against Syria on Thursday. "So you have to, if you’re Russia, ask yourself, is [Syria] a country and a regime that you want to align yourself with?"

Surely, Spicer misspoke and if he had the opportunity to clear things up, he would, right? Wrong.

When asked for clarification, Spicer shoved his foot into his mouth even further, stating: "I think when you come to Sarin gas — [Hitler] was not using the gas on his own people the same way Assad is doing. There was not -- he brought them into the Holocaust centers, I understand that -- in the way Assad where he went into towns, dropped them down into the middle of towns."

Oh, so gas chambers are now "Holocaust centers" and don't count as Hitler gassing his own people because something, something... Spicer is bad at this.

Spicer tends to talk a mile-a-minute when fielding questions during press briefings. That's mistake one. His next mistake was to try to provide some quasi-context for his obviously absurd gaffe, instead of just confronting the clear mistake head-on.

But at least Spicer didn't let this fly during a sacred Jewish holiday like Passover.

Oh wait.


UPDATE: Sean Spicer offered an apology on the White House lawn mere hours after his Hitler reference in the briefing room on Tuesday. The New York Post reports:

“I was obviously trying to make a point about the heinous acts that Assad made against his own people last week using chemical weapons and gas. And frankly I mistakenly used an inappropriate and insensitive reference to the Holocaust for which frankly there is no comparison,” he told CNN’s “The Situation Room with Wolf Blitzer. “For that I apologize. It was mistake to do that.

Blitzer pressed Spicer to say who he was specifically apologizing to — and the White House spokesman said, everyone.

“Clearly anybody who – not just suffered in the holocaust or descendant of anybody – but frankly, you know, anyone offended by the comments,” he said.

“It’s not, as I said, I’m not in any way standing by them (the Hitler comments). I was trying to draw a comparison for which there shouldn’t have been one. It was insensitive and inappropriate. So I’m not looking to quantify this in any way. It was an attempt to talk about – I should have stayed focused on the Assad regime and the dangers they brought to their own people and the terrible atrocities they did and to drag any other comparison into this was not appropriate.”

He added: “It was a mistake, I shouldn’t have done it. I won’t do it again.”