On Friday, the grandfather of one of the three teenagers shot to death with an AR-15 when they broke into an Oklahoma home ripped the young man defending his home, saying, “Brass knuckles against an AR-15, come on, who was afraid for their life.”

Leroy Schumacher, the grandfather of Jacob Redfearn, 17, who broke into the home on March 27 along with Maxwell Cook, 19, and Jake Woodruff, 16, told KTUL,“What these three boys did was stupid. They knew they could be punished for it but they did not deserve to die.” He continued, “There’s got to be a limit to that law, I mean he shot all three of them; there was no need for that. These boys’ families are going to suffer with this for the rest of their lives. We have to live with this for the rest of our lives.”

According to the Wagoner County Sheriff’s Office, the intruders were wearing masks and dressed in black; two of the three were armed, one with a knife and the other with brass knuckles. They were shot by Zach Peters, 23, a criminal justice student and airline employee. The Tulsa World reported that Peters confronted the burglars in a hallway after they briefly exchanged words.

Peters made a 911 call after he shot the intruders in which he said, “I’ve just been broken into. Three men, two I’ve shot in my house,” adding that the men were bleeding. He continued, “I believe one’s down, one’s still talking. You need to get here now.” He stayed on the phone for roughly seven minutes, and also stated, “I shot two of them and now I’m barricaded in my bedroom. They broke in the back door. I can hear one of them talking.”

The robbery was allegedly planned by Elizabeth Marie Rodriguez, 21, who was arrested on a probable cause affidavit for three counts of first-degree murder, one count of first-degree burglary and one count of second-degree burglary. She reportedly knew Peters.

Rodriguez admitted she had dropped the suspects off at the house and fled when she heard gunshots.

Wagoner County Deputy Nick Mahoney said, “It looks like self-defense from the preliminary investigation, but that’s all speculative. There’s some speculation as to whether or not that (Stand Your Ground) law applies in this case, the simple answer is I don’t know.”

Schumacher concluded, “You can’t change history, but you can damn sure learn from it, and maybe some kids will learn from this,"