During the C-SPAN coverage of the Hillary Clinton email investigation, there was a very telling exchange (below) highlighting the seriousness of the content of those leaked, unsecured, and grossly negligent correspondences sent by the former Secretary of State.

Republican Representative Jason Chaffetz of Utah, Chairman of the Oversight and Government Reform Committee, asked the Inspector General of the Intelligence Community, Charles McCullough, "Can you provide this committee, in a secure format, the classified emails?"

"I cannot provide a certain segment of them because the agency that owns the information for those emails has limited the distribution on those," McCullough explained. "They are characterizing them as OrCon, 'originator control,' so I can't give them to even Congress without getting the agency's permission to provide them."

"Which agency?" Chaffetz interjected.

"I can't say that in an open hearing sir," McCullough replied.

Chaffetz, in disbelief, responded, "So you can't even tell me which agency won't allow us, as members of Congress, to see something that Hillary Clinton allowed somebody without a security clearance, in a non-protected format to see. That's correct?"

The chairman then asked McCullough if he can generally tell the committee what the emails were about.

"We shouldn't get into the details of these emails in an open hearing," McCullough responded.

"I don't want to violate that but the concern is it was already violated by Hillary Clinton," Chaffetz told the IG. "It was her choice and she set it up and she created this problem and she created this mess. We shouldn't have to go through this, but she did that."

McCullough responded with the final nail into how serious these emails were, telling the congressional committee that, "This is the segment of emails that I had to have people in my office read-in to particular programs to even see these emails. We didn't posses the required clearances."

"So even the Inspector General for ODNI [Office of the Director of National Intelligence] didn't have the requisite security clearances?" Chaffetz clarified.

"That's correct. I had to get read-ins for them," McCullough said.

"Wow. Unbelievable. What a mess," Chaffetz huffed in exasperation.

Just let that sink in. These emails are too sensitive to even be provided to Congress in a secured manner, but Hillary had them on unprotected servers in her basement and bathroom that were targeted by our enemies.

“We assess it is possible that hostile actors gained access to Secretary Clinton’s personal email account,” FBI Director James Comey told the press this week.

The New York Times puts it this way:

When the F.B.I. director, James B. Comey, said on Tuesday that his investigators had no “direct evidence” that Hillary Clinton’s email account had been “successfully hacked,” both private experts and federal investigators immediately understood his meaning: It very likely had been breached, but the intruders were far too skilled to leave evidence of their work.

Mr. Comey described, in fairly blistering terms, a set of email practices that left Mrs. Clinton’s systems wide open to Russian and Chinese hackers, and an array of others. She had no full-time cybersecurity professional monitoring her system. She took her BlackBerry everywhere she went, “sending and receiving work-related emails in the territory of sophisticated adversaries.”

Exit thought by the presumptive Democrat nominee for president:

hillary clinton, laws