Sen. Elizabeth Warren (D-MA) has found herself dominating headlines after endorsing former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton and as speculation runs rampant about her being Clinton's vice-president.

Warren told MSNBC's Rachel Maddow that while she's not actively lobbying for Clinton's vice-presidential slot, she would be willing to do so if called upon.

"I know there's been a lot of speculation about this, but the truth is I love the work I do," Warren said. "I can't tell you how grateful I am to the people of Massachusetts who sent me here to just wade into these fights and now we're about to enter another big fight and that is a general election fight that pits a tough woman who is willing to lead against a small, insecure bully."

When asked by Maddow if she felt like she could serve as president, Warren replied, "Yes, I do."

Here's everything you need to know about Warren.

Warren is a hard-left radical. Blogger Trevor Loudon has a two-part expose on Warren's ties to far-left groups that can be read here and here. Loudon explains that Warren is close with Heather Booth, a Democrat Party operative who has worked with the Democratic Socialists of America for a long time and was also involved in the Midwest Academy, which trains community organizers with the teachings of the far left Saul Alinsky. Booth and Warren together lobbied President Barack Obama to create a Consumer Finance Protection Agency and Booth's organization, Americans for Financial Reform, pushed for Obama to appoint Warren as the agency's chair.

In Warren's 2012 Senate campaign, the Progressive Democrats of America was heavily involved in funding her and in engaging in "Get Out the Vote" efforts for her. In fact, Warren's Senate race was the only one they were involved in that year, and Warren embraced them with open arms.

No wonder the Communist Party U.S.A. was giddy about Warren.

Warren had the original "You didn't build that" speech. Obama's 2012 speech where he said, "If you’ve got a business, you didn’t build that. Somebody else made that happen," and it blew up into a major campaign issue. But Warren is the one who first publicly made a "you didn't build that" statement back in 2011, when she was still a Harvard professor:

“There is nobody in this country who got rich on their own. Nobody. You built a factory out there - good for you. But I want to be clear. You moved your goods to market on roads the rest of us paid for. You hired workers the rest of us paid to educate. You were safe in your factory because of police forces and fire forces that the rest of us paid for. You didn't have to worry that marauding bands would come and seize everything at your factory... Now look. You built a factory and it turned into something terrific or a great idea - God bless! Keep a hunk of it. But part of the underlying social contract is you take a hunk of that and pay forward for the next kid who comes along.”

Radio host and constitutional scholar Mark Levin turned Warren's words against her:

"Now Ms. Warren, you can keep a chunk of your teaching schedule, but I want a chunk of it," Levin said. "I want to teach your class 50 percent of the time. I'm paying for the roads leading to Harvard, I'm contributing to your salary and to the buildings and to whatever the hell else goes on at Harvard Law. So I own a piece of you. I have a right to a piece of you. So does everybody in my audience."

Levin then said under Warren's logic, he deserved a portion of her salary.

"After all, but for me and millions and millions of others of us who pay federal income taxes, you wouldn't have a salary, would you Ms. Warren?" Levin said. "Why is it the public institutions and people who work at public institutions are immune from the Warren approach to things?"

Warren is a massive hypocrite. Warren portrays herself as a champion of the middle class, sparring against big banks and corporations that are rigging the system. However, according to CNN Money Warren is worth between $3.7 million to $10 million, which included a $430,000 salary as a Harvard law professor. This entrenches Warren as part of the one percent that she's supposedly fighting against. She's also not really fighting against the big banks and corporations, and has vigorously supported government subsidies for corporations like Caterpillar, Boeing and General Electric Bechtel.

Warren didn't always have nice things to say about Clinton. Warren wrote in her book The Two Income Trap that as First Lady, Clinton heeded Warren's advice to come out against a bankruptcy bill, and she convinced her husband to veto it. But when the same bill came up for a vote in 2001, Clinton voted for it as a senator.

"The bill was essentially the same, but Hillary Rodham Clinton was not," Warren wrote. "Hillary Clinton could not afford such a principled position. Campaigns cost money, and that money wasn’t coming from families in financial trouble."

Clinton claimed that she voted for the bill to advance because of amendments added to it, although this wasn't enough for Warren.

"While this amendment may have provided some political cover, it offers virtually no financial help to single mothers, since the overwhelming majority of ex-husbands don’t pay anything in distributions during bankruptcy," Warren wrote. "Of far more importance was the fact that the bill would permit credit card companies to compete with women after bankruptcy for their ex-husbands’ limited income, and this provision remained unchanged in the 1998 and 2001 versions of the bill. Senator Clinton claimed that the bill improved circumstances for single mothers, but her view was not shared by any women’s groups or consumer groups."

Clinton voted against final passage of the bill in 2005, after Warren's book was published.

Warren has touted her supposed Native American heritage, but it turns out her claims were likely false. Legal Insurrection explains that Warren didn't claim to be a Native American until her 30s, when she was listed under the "Minority Law Teachers" section in the directory. When her position as Harvard Law professor became permanent, the school promoted her as a Native American, despite the fact that Warren claims she never told anyone there about her supposed heritage. There is no evidence that Warren's family has any ancestral to ties Native Americans and Warren has never been affiliated with any particular tribe. Warren's excuses are that she has heard "family lore" and that she has "high cheekbones," and neither of them are supported by evidence.

Some leftists are angered by Warren's lack of support for Sen. Bernie Sanders (I-VT) and for endorsing Clinton. Many Sanders supporters lashed out at Warren on social media for not publicly endorsing Sanders. When she endorsed Clinton, some didn't take it lightly:

Warren ran a TARP oversight panel that was scrutinized for how it used taxpayer money. The panel was tasked with monitoring the Troubled Asset Relief Program bailout money using $10.4 million in taxpayer funding. Around $8.7 million went towards salaries and benefits, $768,851 was used to cover printing costs and the panel itself spent $8.3 million, but Warren and the other Democrats on the committee fought Republican efforts to make the amount of money spent on certain targets available to lawmakers and to the public. This raised questions during Warren's Senate campaign, and her spokesman simply said they supported releasing the records to the public now that the panel has completed its task.

The Consumer Financial Protection Bureau in Dodd-Frank was Warren's idea–and it's a disaster. As explained earlier, Warren supported the creation of some sort of Consumer Financial Protection Agency, which later became the Consumer Financial Production Bureau in the law. Warren was under consideration to chair the agency, but Obama went another way. There's no way for the federal government to hold the bureau accountable, as its funded entirely by the Federal Reserve, hence bypassing congressional oversight, and the agency doesn't have to report to the Office Management and Budget, bypassing executive oversight. Meanwhile, the bureau is pummeling the financial industry with its burdensome regulations and its tentacles are in every aspect of the sector.

Clinton likely won't pick Warren as her vice-president. A "Democratic Insider" told Politico that Clinton "hates [Warren], and she doesn’t want a competitor for power in her White House. The 'V.P. candidate as attack dog' thing is long over. Every single Democrat is and will be attacking Trump every day."

The Daily Wire's Amanda Presitigiacomo has seven things you need to know about Warren here.