Children as young as two years old in the U.K. are participating in a program where drag queens read children's stories and sing songs about transgenderism in an effort to erase gender norms and supposedly reduce hate crimes against LGBT folks.

The program, dubbed "Drag Queen Story Time," entails men in full-drag visiting "schools, libraries, and government-subsidized nurseries to educate and interact with young children through storytelling and song-sharing," as reported by The Blaze.

There are similar programs here in the U.S., such as "Drag Queen Story Hour," where men in drag read to children in public libraries, which apparently inspired this particular U.K. deep-dive into transgender indoctrination.

One of the stories the U.K. drag queens read to the impressionable children is about a teddy bear who apparently suffers from gender dysphoria and "realizes" he is a girl and not a boy. Additionally, as noted by The Blaze, one of the songs taught to the children was an adaptation of "The Wheels on the Bus," which includes the lyrics, "the skirt on the drag queen goes swish, swish, swish."

Thomas Canham, a Bristol University law graduate, runs the classes and is hopeful to spread the gender identity indoctrination to all London Early Years Foundation-funded nurseries.

The 26-year-old believes gender and expression of biological sex is constructed, referring to the notion of masculinity as "meaningless."

"We aren’t born with any form of hatred," he told The Daily Mail. "You get taught it over time."

Boasting of the program, Canham claimed drag queens teaching gender ambiguity to toddlers “makes perfect sense."

"They’re performers, larger than life! It is exactly what children want," he said.

"We’re not trying to pitch narratives," Canham outrageously claimed, “just introducing the concept of it existing."

"By providing spaces in which children can see people who defy rigid gender restrictions, it allows them to imagine the world in which people can present themselves as they wish," added London Early Years Foundation chief executive June O’Sullivan.

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