It may be easiest at this point to just compile the names of prominent people who aren’t rapists, child molesters, or public masturbators. I suspect it’s a list small enough to fit into Twitter’s new 280 character limit. We can keep the non-degenerates around and send the rest to the Moon or Australia (sorry, Australia).

Several names have been added to the accused pervert club just in the past week. Multiple women have alleged that famous comedian Louis C.K. likes to pleasure himself in front of unsuspecting and unwilling spectators (C.K. now admits this). Roy Moore in Alabama has been accused of molesting a 14-year-old girl almost 40 years ago. Mariah Carey has been accused of sexual harassment. Steven Segal, too. Charlie Sheen was accused of raping Corey Haim when he was 13. Those were all just this week. Mark Halperin, prominent journalist, was accused last week (I think; I've lost track). The list of other Hollywood and media people facing allegations in the past five weeks or so includes but is not limited to:

  • Harvey Weinstein
  • Kevin Spacey
  • Ben Affleck
  • Roy Price
  • Oliver Stone
  • John Besh
  • James Toback
  • Terry Richardson
  • Jeremy Piven
  • Dustin Hoffman
  • Brett Ratner

Of course this is to say nothing of the politicians who’ve been accused or found guilty of various sexual improprieties or affairs over recent years. Weiner, Clinton, Trump, Hastert, Edwards, Craig, Foley, Wu, Souder. Those are just the ones I can name off the top of my head. And we haven’t mentioned the serial sexual predators who now qualify as old news: Cosby, Sandusky, etc.

Not all of these people have been proven guilty. Some have, though. Some have admitted to their sins, others haven’t. Some of the accused here may be entirely innocent. Who you believe and who you don’t probably depends on your politics, which is one problem. Another problem is that the tidal wave of accusations could, or maybe already has, taken on a bit of a Salem Witch Trials vibe. There’s a certain hysteria to it all, and those accused will suffer the social consequences whether they’re ever found guilty or not. I’m really not sure how to balance that issue with the need to name, shame, and prosecute the real predators.

It’s clear, in any case, that a great many of our famous people are degenerates. So, when Corey Feldman claims that there’s a powerful pedophile ring active in Hollywood, and that many child actors have been filtered through it, I believe him. And when I read reports about the various powerful politicians and celebrities who used to hang out with billionaire pedophile Jeffrey Epstein on his private island where he kept underage sex slaves, I suspect that the network of sex creeps and child rapists extends past Hollywood and into D.C. and beyond.

Meanwhile, we’re told that there’s a so-called “rape epidemic” in the university system. I don’t think there’s any evidence of this epidemic, but it is apparent that colleges are places where millions of young people pass the time by getting black out drunk and sexually using (if not always abusing — though the distinction is murky) each other. The problem doesn’t begin in college. There have been 17,000 reported sexual assaults by students in public school over just a four year period. Sexual assaults by teachers are even more common. It’s estimated that one in ten students will be abused by a teacher in public school at some point. There are 50 million kids in public schools right now. You do the math.

Hollywood, D.C., academia. Chock full of perverts, it seems. We can’t forget the church, of course. And not just the Catholic Church. Protestants have a sex abuse problem as bad or worse.

Where can a person go to get away from these deviants? Certainly not to the doctor. Physician sexual abuse is widespread, including the recent high profile cases involving Olympic gymnasts molested by a team doctor. Possibly the worst serial pedophile in American history was a pediatrician who went to jail a few years ago for abusing over 100 young patients.

What’s left? What’s the next profession to be revealed as a breeding ground for rapists? Electricians? Dog groomers?

This stuff is everywhere. It really can’t be broken down on political, or religious, or even gender grounds. Men seem more likely to be the abuser, but the problem is not exclusive to them. Though we tend to brush these kinds of cases to the side, the fact remains that an enormous number of female teachers have been found guilty of sexually harassing or assaulting their pubescent male students. Any attempt to place the blame on one particular group falls apart. The crisis it too widespread. It encompasses too many different types of people. It has leaked into too many corners of our society.

It appears that there’s a serious problem with our culture as a whole. Of course, the first problem with our culture is the same with every culture: we are a fallen and sinful species. But our fallen and sinful nature seems to be manifesting itself more and more in the form of degeneracy and sexual predation. Why?

Well, perhaps we should consider the possibility that the Sexual Revolution was a catastrophic failure. It probably is not a coincidence that the vanguards of the revolution — Hollywood and academia — harbor the highest level of deviants. It also is probably not a coincidence that the male-on-male rape epidemic in the Church began in the '60’s, precisely when the leadership of the Church, especially in the United States, decided to adopt a more enlightened and culturally acceptable view of sexuality. They loosened the rules a bit, started being more tolerant, and almost instantly their ranks were filled with boy-raping men.

Maybe we ought to consider adopting again some semblance of sexual morality in our culture. Maybe it was not such a stellar idea to throw out every ethical rule governing sexual activity. Maybe we should think about reevaluating other things, too, like:

1) Our love of pornography.

2) Our belief that sexually-charged young people should wait until they’re 35 to get married and finally channel their sexual energies in a positive and procreative direction.

3) Our idiotic insistence that every single thing in society be co-ed, and that there ought to be no socially enforced codes of conduct governing how men and women interact with each other.

Maybe all of these ideas and strategies are terrible and have blown up in our faces in spectacular fashion. Maybe if you’re a proponent of the modern and liberal approach to sexuality, you are just simply wrong about everything.

Or maybe we should continue doing exactly what we’re doing, because it seems to be working out so well.

I think I know which option we’ll choose.