Last week, leftists at Cosmopolitan and REDBOOK claimed dressing your non-Pacific Islander daughter as Moana constituted an act of "cultural appropriation."

This week, they're claiming dressing your white children as Queen Elsa, the lead character in the Disney classic, Frozen, is similarly problematic — because the costume reaffirms the notion of "white beauty."

According to feminist social justice parenting blogger, Sachi Feris, who runs the site, Raising Race Conscious Children, there are few Disney-themed costumes that are, in any way, appropriate for woke babies. If you dress your child as a Disney heroine of color, you're risking claims of racism, but if you dress your child as a white Disney princess, she (or he) could be blamed for perpetuating ideas that give rise to white supremacy — notably, that "white beauty" is somehow superior.

"There is one thing I don’t like about the character of Elsa," Feris writes. "I feel like because Elsa is a White princess, and we see so many white princesses, her character sends the message that you have to be a certain way to be “beautiful” or to be a 'princess' ... that you have to have white skin, long, blonde hair, and blue eyes."

Elsa is, of course, tall and lanky, with flowing white-blonde hair. Her sister, Anna, however, has reddish-brown hair and darker eyes, and is still considered beautiful. As a blonde princess, of course, Elsa is nearly alone among her more contemporary peers. Sleeping Beauty and Cinderella are blonde, but Belle of Beauty and the Beast is a brunette. Princess Jasmine is Middle Eastern. Princess Tiana is African-American. Merida of Brave is a redhead. Elena of Avalor is Hispanic. Moana is Polyneisan.

But you can't dress as any of those princesses because doing so would be "cultural appropriation." And you can't dress your child in an appropriate-to-her-heritage culture because that rasies concerns that you might be identifying your own culture as somehow superior.

It's exceptionally confusing being a radical leftist. Heck, even Daily Wire Editor-in-Chief Ben Shapiro's suggestion that you dress your child as a Rubik's Cube might be problematic: after all, what if your child can't complete the party game? Does that make them less intelligent? Are you telling other children they're less than your child for being unable to solve the cube in a matter of moments?

Feris said she's dressing her daughter as Mickey Mouse, but other "woke" internet personalities were quick to point out that the famous rodent has his own touchy history.