California has somehow become even more radical in its "soft on crime" approach. The state has now lessened the punishment for knowingly exposing someone else to HIV.

Now, if you knowingly expose a partner to HIV in California, the crime is a mere misdemeanor rather than a felony. Per The Los Angeles Times:

Gov. Jerry Brown signed a bill Friday that lowers from a felony to a misdemeanor the crime of knowingly exposing a sexual partner to HIV without disclosing the infection.

Moreover, the measure is expanded to knowingly giving HIV-positive blood to a blood bank.

The extreme move is, of course, being made under the guise of tolerance.

"Today California took a major step toward treating HIV as a public health issue, instead of treating people living with HIV as criminals," said Democratic state Sen. Scott Wiener. "HIV should be treated like all other serious infectious diseases, and that’s what SB 239 does."

Although people still die from AIDS, exposing people to HIV without their knowledge or consent was justified because "modern medicine allows those with HIV to live longer lives and nearly eliminates the possibility of transmission," per Weiner and Democratic Assemblyman Todd Gloria.

This destructive, immoral move is apparently not isolated to the loons in California. Planned Parenthood, America's largest abortion mill and one of the most powerful unofficial arms of the Democratic Party, claimed not disclosing HIV to partners was a "right."

The Daily Wire reported in December of 2016:

Kimberly Ells of The Federalist exposed the tax-dollar funded corporation for their despicable view, which they advocate via literature like the International Planned Parenthood Federation’s booklet, directed toward the HIV-positive youth in America, called “Healthy, Happy and Hot”:

It says, “Young people living with HIV have the right to decide if, when, and how to disclose their HIV status.” It continues: “Sharing your HIV status is called disclosure. Your decision about whether to disclose may change with different people and situations. You have the right to decide if, when, and how to disclose your HIV status.”