Many have used the term “psychopath” to describe Las Vegas gunman Stephen Paddock following the deadliest shooting in United States history. According to the world’s leading expert on psychopathic behavior, the number of psychopaths in the world is growing due to online pornography and violent video games.

The shooting left 59 dead with over 500 more injured, as Paddock fired upon a group of country music concert goers from a room at the Mandalay Bay Resort and Casino.

The term “psychopath” first came to light when the media reported that Paddock’s father, who was a career criminal, was described as being “psychopathic” in an FBI wanted poster.

In his book, The Wisdom of Psychopaths: What Saints, Spies, and Serial Killers Can Teach Us About Success, University of Oxford research psychologist Dr. Kevin Dutton Ph.D. described a conversation that he had with the world’s leading expert on psychopathic and criminal behavior, Robert Hare, Professor of Psychology at the University of British Columbia.

In the conversation, Dutton asked Hare if he thinks that modern-day society is becoming more psychopathic. Here was Hare's response:

I think in general, yes, society is becoming more psychopathic. I mean, there’s stuff going on nowadays that we wouldn’t have seen twenty, even ten, years ago. Kids are becoming anesthetized to normal sexual behavior by early exposure to pornography on the internet. Rent-a-friend sites are getting more popular on the Web, because folks are either too busy or too techy to make real ones. And I read a report the other day that linked a significant rise in the number of all-female gangs to the increasingly violent nature of modern video game culture. In fact, I think if you’re looking for evidence that society is becoming more psychopathic, the recent hike in female criminality is particularly revealing.

Dutton describes two-kinds of psychopaths in his book, "Cobras" and "Pit Bulls," neither of which is recognized as an official medical term, but the distinctions made between the two are noted in various other medical literature.

Cobras are described as:

  • Displays violence towards others
  • Feels little remorse
  • Motivated by the desire for immediate gratification
  • Able to let go and move on
  • Feels superior
  • Fast talker; able to spin story to the authorities
  • Charming and charismatic
  • Control means not being told what to do
  • Traumatic upbringing; violence prevalent in family
  • Impermeable to therapeutic intervention

Pit Bulls are described as:

  • Usually only violent towards partner
  • Shows some level of guilt
  • Motivated by fear of abandonment
  • Obsessive; often stalks victims
  • Adopts the role of “victim”
  • Greater emotional lability
  • Depressed and introverted
  • Control means constant monitoring of partner
  • Some degree of violence in family background
  • Sometimes benefits from treatment programs