Most of Hollywood has yet to understand that pushing leftism in their films and bashing half the audience doesn't exactly equal good ticket sales. Key word: Most. At least one Hollywood player, director Mathew Vaughn of Kingsman 2, has gotten the message.

In an interview with EW, Vaughn explained that consideration for his audience led him to edit out several anti-Trump references in the blockbuster hit because he knew that people would not be pleased.

Apparently the shady CEO, played by Julianne Moore in the film, had a few lines about wanting to host NBC's The Apprentice that were then deleted to keep the partisanship out.

“We actually took out The Apprentice line,” said Vaughn, “because we felt it was too close to the bone. I think America’s going through a pretty interesting and rough ride at the moment and I wanted this movie to be escapism. And that means not suddenly have half the audience going, ‘That’s not cool, that’s not funny!’ as the other half is cheering.”

Another Trump dig was decorating a White House set in his signature gold and gaudy taste, which also did not make the final cut.

“We were building a White House Oval Office in the style of Trump Tower. We were making it in all gold and blinging it up. This was in May of 2016 and then I had an inkling. I remember saying to my American production designer, ‘Trump might win, you know? Would this be as funny if Trump won?’ And he was like, ‘Trump will never win.’ And I said, ‘You know what, I have a weird feeling he might. So let’s build a normal Oval Office and scrap the Trump version.’"

Looking back, Vaughn knows he made the right decision, because "if you go too far — if movies get political when they’re meant to be fun — then it weighs everything down a bit too much."

It only took a summer's worth of box office flops, poor ratings at the Oscars and Emmys, and the public's all-around disdain with Hollywood to realize the obvious: insulting customers just drives them away.

Good for Vaughn for letting reason get in the way of partisanship for once.