Bernie Sanders, whose socialist agenda has no problem stealing Peter to pay Paul (or in his case, stealing from those with money to give to those who don’t), the same man who represents himself as the champion of the downtrodden, appears to be just fine not paying back the cities he visited in the 2016 campaign for the security services they provided him.

Across the nation, in the states of Arizona, California, Ohio, Pennsylvania, Washington and Wisconsin, the Sanders campaign still owes a disputed $450,000 to various cities. Those figures include over $117,000 to the Santa Monica, California police department; $67,000 to the Irvine, California police department; over $44,000 to the Tucson, Arizona police department; over $33,000 to the Spokane, Washington police department; over $28,000 to the city of Vallejo, California; over $28,000 to the National City, California police department; over $25,000 to Upper Providence Township in Pennsylvania; over $23,000 to the Cloverdale, California police department, and over $22,000 to the Solano County Sheriff’s Office in Fairfield, California.

Meanwhile, the Trump and Clinton campaigns have settled all their debts.

Undaunted by the money he may well owe to the cities of California, Sanders is visiting the state in September; Sanders will speak at the tri-annual convention of the California Nurses Association-National Nurses Organizing Committee on September 22 in San Francisco. That will come roughly a week after he introduces his Medicare-for-all legislation.

Sanders does seem to have a problem with personal responsibility; he was kicked out of a commune in 1971 for "sitting around and talking" about politics instead of working. The infection seems to also plague his wife Jane, as there have been allegations that she provided false documentation to obtain a loan from People's United Bank to purchase a piece of land for the Burlington College when she was president. The Burlington Free Press noted in late August, "The college took on $10 million in debt to buy a new lakefront campus in 2010 under former President Jane O'Meara Sanders. When fundraising fell short of expectations, Sanders' successors attempted to stabilize the college finances by selling 27.5 acres of its 32-acre campus to a developer."