Actress and pro-life advocate Patricia Heaton, whom everybody loved on Everybody Loves Raymond, took heavy shots at CBS for their abysmal report on Iceland's miraculous cure for Down Syndrome — abortion — which CBS undercut by using soft words like "eliminate" instead of "murder."

As noted by John Nolte earlier, the CBS report contained hauntingly coded language — using words like "disappear" and "eliminating" — when referring to Down Syndrome, as though the genetic condition was being slowly and naturally eradicated. They were either intentionally prevaricating from, or woefully ignorant of, the fact that Down Syndrome is being exterminated via the murderous enterprise of abortion.

Since prenatal screening tests were introduced in Iceland in the early 2000s, the vast majority of women — close to 100 percent — who received a positive test for Down syndrome terminated their pregnancy. While the tests are optional, the government states that all expectant mothers must be informed about availability of screening tests, which reveal the likelihood of a child being born with Down syndrome. Around 80 to 85 percent of pregnant women choose to take the prenatal screening test, according to Landspitali University Hospital in Reykjavik.

Heaton hit CBS with some raw truth about the meaning of the word "eliminate" in this context.

Heaton's followers got in on the slap CBS session to share some of their stories with Down Syndrome. They were heartbreaking:

This particular tweet from Bethany Mandel speaks to the inhuman cruelty at work.

This is not the first time Patricia Heaton has been an outspoken advocate on behalf of the pro-life movement. The actress, who told media in 2014 that she feels she is "supposed" to speak out on the issue of abortion, even if it means she is often at opposition with her colleagues in Hollywood, is often advocating for pro-life policies on social media.

“I find it impossible to subscribe to a philosophy that believes that the destruction of human life is a legitimate solution to a problem that is mostly social, economic and psychological," she says.