Feminists complain ad nauseam about the lack of female Fortune 500 CEOs, yet never seem to bemoan the dearth of women in the fields of plumbing, construction, and waste management. Enter overpaid actress Salma Hayek, whose experience with any of the above jobs is listening to her interior designer relay the plans for erecting her state-of-the-art $3 million kitchen.

In an interview with Net-a-Porter’s magazine, The Edit, Hayek said society holds men to "lower standards" of work ethic, creating entitled sloths who ask for more money without having earned it.

"Women work harder than men and are more demanding of themselves, yet they have the sensation they don’t do enough, and therefore they are less daring about asking for a better position or salary," she said.

"Men do a lot less, they are less demanding on themselves and their standards are lower, yet they feel entitled to ask for a raise or a promotion,” she continued, sitting comfortably in an air-conditioned office built by the lazy men she was bashing.

"[Women] are a lot more demanding of ourselves than men are," she reiterated. "It’s a horrible sensation — we’re not enough at work; we’re not enough for the guy who’s cheating on us; we’re not enough for our children who always want more of us, no matter what we give."

Surely, feminists are tripping over themselves to denounce Hayek's divisive rhetoric endorsing misandry. Not so much. Julie Bindel of The Guardian took it as an opportunity to let off some steam and prove she knows nothing about office culture, as she probably wrote the article from the comfort of her home office that was also built by men:

This will not surprise any woman who has seen her male counterparts spend an hour playing online poker before striding into the boss’s office and cockily asking for a pay rise. This is all fuel to the fire in our sexist culture. Women rarely feel good enough about themselves, and tend to feel under pressure to do more for less praise and fewer pounds. Whereas men can roll into the office looking like death in a carrier bag, women tend to be under pressure to look as fresh as a daisy.

This all hits at an unspoken truth that men dare not utter, but since I have the floor, I'll say it: feminists want all the fun, prestigious stuff and none of the hard stuff — the backbreaking work that men perform everyday so that Salma Hayek can waltz her overpaid self onto movie sets where sycophantic interns fetch her coffee. Yet another example of how "feminists ruin everything."