In an article from the Associated Press, “gender experts" offered their opinions as to how a parent could know whether their young child is transgender, and the answers paint a disturbing picture of how those who believe in gender theory believe a young child’s mind has a certainty that is far more reflective of an adult’s.

Asked questions such as how can a parent know if their child is transgender, what separates a young boy who might be transgender from one with a vivid imagination who likes to dress up in his sister's dresses, and what a parent should do if their daughter tells you she's a boy, here’s an example of the push toward gender fluidity among “gender experts”:

Responding to a scenario in which a boy likes to wear dresses, and asked whether that was a phase or something more, Diane Ehrensaft, director of mental health at the University of California, San Francisco's Child and Adolescent Gender Center and author of The Gender Creative Child, replied:

My answer is, we don't know. What we know is, you have a son who likes princess dresses. I would say get him the dresses. (emphasis added.) Have your child feel free to choose. Maybe they'll stop wearing dresses. Maybe they'll grow up to be gay.

Answering critics questioning whether preschool-age kids should be allowed to "socially transition," Ehrensaft pontificated: "We expect a 2-year-old to know 'I am boy. I am girl.' So why can't that also apply to transgender children?"

Ehrensaft listed early signs of whether a child might be transgender: toddlers pulling barrettes from their hair, grabbing for their sister's dress and dolls, or throwing away their trucks.

Great. An 18-month old boy won’t play with his trucks. Let’s make him a girl.

Ehrensaft said another sign could be instead of a boy saying, "I wish I was a girl," saying, "I am a girl."

And if he says he’s a hippopotamus, what then?

Ehrensaft said children by the age of three understand "penis equals boy, and vagina equals girl," then offered this: "Often those are the kids who cry out, 'Why did God get it wrong? Mommy, can you put me back inside so I can come out like my sister?'"

At the age of 3.

It’s positively amazing how much children between the ages of 18 months and three years know about their sexuality.

Ehrensaft, speaking of one “contemporary model of gender development,” has written, “The role of parents and socialization agents is not to shape or reinforce a child’s gender identity or expressions, but rather to facilitate it, mirroring back to the child the messages that the child communicates about their preferred gender expressions and articulated gender identity, which may or may not be in concordance with the sex assigned to the child at birth.”