On Tuesday, Israeli authorities arrested three Jews at the hallowed Temple Mount after they gathered to recite Kaddish, the Jewish mourning prayer for the dead, on behalf of the Salomon family, who were slaughtered in their home by a Palestinian terrorist last Friday.

As The Daily Wire reported, two of the victims, a woman in her 60s and a man in his 30s, died at the time of the attack. The third victim, a woman in her 70s, later died of wounds inflicted during the attack. The vicious attack occurred during the eve of Shabbat, a holy night in the Jewish week when families come together to take stock of all their blessings. The Palestinian terrorist attacked his three Israeli victims after he infiltrated a home at the Halamish settlement in the West Bank at a time when he presumably knew that Jews were particularly vulnerable and off-guard.

And now, instead of allowing Jewish mourners to gather at one of the holiest sites in Judaism to honor their memory, Israeli authorities decide to maintain the Muslim-only status quo at the Temple Mount even as Palestinians violently riot and refuse to worship at the site their ancestors colonized centuries ago through the imperialistic conquests of Umar ibn Al-Khattāb, the leader of the Rashidun Caliphate. It was only during the bloody reign of the Ummayad Caliphate in the late 7th century when al-Aqsa was built into an Islamic shrine.

Despite the sordid history of brutal Islamic colonialism and the Jewish people’s three-millennia long connection to the Temple Mount, Israeli authorities have allowed the Jordanian Waqf to effectively turn the site into a no-go zone for Jews.

As a result, the mourners who wished to honor the memory of the slain Salomon family with a lamentation prayer were technically trespassing and therefore violating a law; a law that prohibits Jewish prayer at the site out of fear of angering the insecure Muslim masses who would likely riot if their religious monopoly were challenged.

One of the Jews arrested Tuesday was deeply distraught by the religious discrimination he faced at the hands of Israeli authorities, who seemed content to play into Palestinian threats and violence.

“It was devastating," Rabbi and activist Ari Abramowitz told The Jerusalem Post. "It was clear to me that going there [to the Temple Mount] is the calling of all the Jewish people, that there could be no peace unless we made the issue about God."

Rabbi Abramowitz continued:

As far as I know, this is the first time a minyan has been assembled to say Kaddish on the site. After they detained me, I heard the police say on the walkie-talkie that they would have to arrest the entire group because they said 'amen' at the end of the prayer and that constitutes a violation of the regulations of the site.

As The Jerusalem Post noted, Rabbi Abramowitz was aware of the law forbidding Jews to pray at the Temple Mount but decided to recite the mourner’s Kaddish for the slain Jewish family anyway. “Of course I'm going to violate the law” given its unjust nature, he asserted.

For over a week now, Muslim rioters have assembled outside of the Temple Mount, engaging in violence and refusing to pray at the al-Aqsa mosque, situated at the holy site, until Israel walks back all security measures implemented in the wake of an Islamic terrorist attack that left two Israeli-Druze police officers dead. On Monday, Israel accepted the Muslim mob’s terms and removed all metal detectors from outside the entrance of the mosque.

But that wasn’t good enough, apparently. Now, the Islamic clerics leading the violent mob are calling for the removal of all security cameras as well.