Reporter Greg Howard accuses white women on sidewalks of being racist in a New York Times essay titled "Was That Racist."

You see, Howard is convinced "almost all" white women refuse to move out of his way when he walks toward them on the sidewalk, forcing him "off the sidewalk completely." The reason for this likely exaggerated or completely made-up observation? Racism, of course.

"In seven years of living and walking here, I’ve found that most people walk courteously — but that white women, at least when I’m in their path, do not," explains Howard.

"Sometimes they’re buried in their phones. Other times, they’re in pairs and groups, and in conversation. But often, they’re looking ahead, through me, if not quite at me," the former Deadspin reporter continues.

"When white women are in my path, they almost always continue straight, forcing me to one side without changing their course," he complains. "This happens several times a day; and a couple of times a week, white women force me off the sidewalk completely. In these instances, when I'm standing in the street or in the dirt as a white woman strides past, broad-shouldered and blissful, I turn furious."

Howard boils down the reason for such alleged encounters to white women's racism, suggesting the women are stereotyping black men as "dangerous" and thus refusing to move as to not show "fear" and welcome harm. He also suggests white women are incapable of seeing black men at all.

"After these encounters, I’m always left with questions. Why only and specifically white women? Do they refuse to acknowledge me because they’ve been taught that they should fear black men, and that any acknowledgment of black men can invite danger? Do they refuse to acknowledge me because to alter their route would be to show their fear? Do they not see me? Can they not see me?"