Feminist writer Jody Allard has a habit of shaming her two sons, one of whom she says is suicidal, for simply disagreeing with her, or worse, for simply being male. Last week, writing in Role Reboot, the mother of two yet again relentlessly shamed her sons for their biology, and then topped herself by explaining that they are, like every other man, "not safe."

And by "not safe," she means prospective rapists.

Allard first asserts that while her sons are "good boys," they aren't "safe boys," before bragging about a "semi-viral" essay she wrote for The Washington Post in which she shames her sons for their role in feminist-constructed "rape culture" for merely having penises.

"My essay went semi-viral, and for the first time my sons encountered my words about them on their friends’ phones, their teachers’ computers, and even overheard them discussed by strangers on a crowded metro bus. It was one thing to agree to be written about in relative obscurity, and quite another thing to have my words intrude on their daily lives," she explains.

Unsurprisingly, her teenage boys, whom she's publicly shamed for no other reason than their anatomy, now resent her. One of her sons is even turning to — gasp — conservatism:

One of my sons was hurt by my words, although he’s never told me so. He doesn’t understand why I lumped him and his brother together in my essay. He sees himself as the “good” one, the one who is sensitive and thoughtful, and who listens instead of reacts. He doesn’t understand that even quiet misogyny is misogyny, and that not all sexists sound like Twitter trolls. He is angry at me now, although he won’t admit that either, and his anger led him to conservative websites and YouTube channels; places where he can surround himself with righteous indignation against feminists, and tell himself it’s ungrateful women like me who are the problem.

"Is it my job as his mother to ensure he feels safe emotionally, no matter what violence he spews? Is it my job as his mother to steer and educate, no matter how much that education challenges his view of himself?" the feminist asks herself.

"When I hear his voice become defensive, I back off but question whether I’m doing him any favors by allowing his perception of himself to go unchallenged. When I confront him with his own sexism, I question whether I’m pushing too hard and leaving him without an emotional safe space in his home," Allard explains.

The essayist then has a momentary epiphany, right before her own bigotry concerning men gets the best of her.

"As a single mother, I sometimes wonder whether the real problem is that my sons have no role models for the type of men I hope they become," she writes.

YES! These boys need male role models in their lives, hopefully males who will also shield them from your incessant shaming for their immutable qualities.

But Allard quickly kills the idea due to her belief that all men are evil — you know, that thing we're told feminists never believe.

"But when I look around at the men I know, I’m not sure a male partner would fill that hole. Where are these men who are enlightened but not arrogant? Who are feminists without self-congratulation? If my sons need role models, they may have to become their own. ... If the feminist men — the men who proudly declare their progressive politics and their fight for quality — aren’t safe, then what man is? No man, I fear," she asserts.

Her reasoning is even more bigoted, believe it or not: Basically, since all white people are born with the inherent sin of being white and are thusly racist beyond their control, even if subliminally, then why can't all men by inherently misogynistic, too?

But if it’s impossible for a white person to grow up without adopting racist ideas, simply because of the environment in which they live, how can I expect men not to subconsciously absorb at least some degree of sexism? White people aren’t safe, and men aren’t safe, no matter how much I’d like to assure myself that these things aren’t true.

And therein lies the evil of collectivism rooted in virtuous victimhood.

Allard emphasizes that her sons' inherent sinfulness, along with the rest of the male population's, is not her fault, it's society's:

It pains me to say that I don’t feel emotionally safe with [men], and perhaps never have with a man, but it needs to be said because far too often we are afraid to say it. This is not a reflection of something broken or damaged in me; it is a reflection of the systems we build and our boys absorb. Those little boys grow into men who know the value of women, the value that’s been ascribed to us by a broken system, and it seeps out from them in a million tiny, toxic ways.

More disturbingly, Allard has previously spoken about one of her sons being suicidal. In a post as recent as May, the feminist wrote in Role Reboot about her and her suicidal son watching 13 Reasons Why, a show that has been argued to glorify suicide.

Someone get this chick a Mother of the Year award.

Curiously, Allard also has at least one daughter about whom we can't find any public shaming pieces.