In its quest to "empower young women," feminist magazine Teen Vogue has published a disturbing promotional "anal 101" sex guide, complete with sex toy advice, for their audience of mostly teen girls, many of whom have yet to reach the age of consent.

Empowering, indeed. It’s unclear just how many young girls will enter the STEM field in light of this inspiring sex post.

"It’s important that we talk about all kinds of sex because not everyone is having, or wants to have, ‘penis in the vagina’ sex,” writes feminist "sex educator" Gigi Engle in the post, titled Anal Sex: What You Need To Know.

"This is anal 101, for teens, beginners, and all inquisitive folk," Engle clarifies.

After explaining that any stigma attached to anal sex is simply driven from historically-illiterate judgmental freaks (the Greeks did it!), Engle turns on the graphic how-to mode.

Warning: This is, uh, graphic...

“The anus is a muscle that needs to be worked up to having larger objects inserted. Start with finger or a small (I do mean v. small) butt plug and either warm yourself up or have a partner help. To do this, lube up your finger or toy and gently massage the anus. As you feel more aroused and comfortable, work the object inside. Gently move it around to loosen up the area,” directs Engle.

“Never put any toy up your butt that does not have a flared base,” she continues. “You do not want to lose anything up there — the rectum is expansive. No, you cannot just ‘poop it out.’”

“I want to personally assure you that that you will not poop on anyone during anal sex. Sure, there are horror stories, but aren’t there always?” says the feminist. “That being said, yes, you will come in contact with some fecal matter. You are entering a butthole. It is where poop comes out. Expecting to do anal play and see zero poop isn’t particularly realistic. It’s NOT a big deal. Everyone poops. Everyone has a butt.”

Engle even provides diagrams for her audience, of course being sure to use terms which do not specify gender. A male is deemed a "prostate owner" and a female, a "non-prostate owner."

(In case you missed it, feminists have decided biological men can be women, too. #Science)

Aside from pushing sex on young girls in the first place, the guide nearly entirely neglects to address all the serious risks that come with anal sex. The Independent reports:

What it fails to tell them is the potential dangers of anal sex. The possibilities of fissures and tears which can become infected very easily due to contamination by faeces, severe enough to need surgery, or lead to anal abscesses which increase the chances of catching HIV. By treating anal sex as an equivalent to vaginal sex, you increase the chances that your audience will not understand the potential damage they can do to their own or their partner’s body, and in turn increase their chances of becoming seriously ill.

Here's more, from the Medical Institute for Sexual Health:

The Center for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) just released (August 2016) a new fact sheet on “Anal Sex and HIV Risk”. The first statement on the page says, “Anal sex is the riskiest sexual behavior for getting and transmitting HIV for men and women.” It goes on to say that receptive anal sex is 13 times more risky than insertive anal sex for acquiring HIV infection.8 In heterosexual anal intercourse, it is the woman who is always experiencing the highest sexual risk for the transmission of HIV, receptive anal intercourse. Furthermore, receptive anal intercourse carries a risk 17 times greater than receptive vaginal intercourse. Moreover, receptive anal intercourse even carries a risk 2 times greater than that of needle-sharing during injection drug use.9

Teen Vogue has also pushed a “non-binary” lifestyle on their readers and has even celebrated abortion.

As if this weren't already clear enough, if you have daughter, for the love of all things holy, do not let them read any feminist magazine, ever.