“Climate change” and “child marriage” are “interconnected” issues, said Chelsea Clinton on Monday. Participating in a left-wing discussion panel framed as a meeting for “social justice,” she was introduced as an “activist, thought leader, and change agent.”


Using "climate change" as a euphemism for the narrative of anthropogenic global warming, Clinton framed the burning of fossil fuels as exacerbating other perceived social and political issues (emphasis added):

“[We] carry multiple concerns in both our head and our heart. Just listening to the concerns around education and climate change, women’s health, child marriage, access to technology, all of those are of course interconnected. We have to focus on each of them in their interconnectedness.”

Clinton also suggested that President Donald Trump’s political ascendance was amplifying varying bigotries:

“We have to realize, especially at this moment, that sexism is not an opinion. Islamophobia is not an opinion. Racism is not an opinion. Homophobia is not an opinion. Jingoism is not an opinion. So I think that in our posture of listening, we also have to get comfortable with standing up and speaking out.”

Barbara Bush - eldest daughter of former President George Bush - also joined the panel, describing access to health care goods and services as “a right” while hyping “social justice" (emphasis added):



“I’m really lucky in that the work that I do at Global Health Corps, I get to work with young leaders from around the world that are passionate about social justice and believe that health is a human right.”

Clinton repeatedly stated that "health is a human right."

The event was hosted by CARE, a left-wing 501(c)(3) public charity that agitates for international wealth redistribution under the guise of “foreign aid,” “international development,” and “humanitarianism.”

Prevalent themes of the event included “feminism” (framing females as oppressed relative to and by men across the entirety of human history), “social justice” (religious groups such as Muslims were framed as “marginalized” in America and the broader West; income and wealth inequality between varying groups), and positioning socialism as a remedy for poverty.

Despite the event’s stated concern in addressing “global poverty,” not a word was spoken on the value of property rights, free markets, the rule of law, free speech and expression, or representative government.

Michelle Nunn, the event's host, said Trump's perceived skepticism toward "foreign assistance" threatens the lives of millions of people. She channeled left-wing prescriptions for central economic planning reminiscent of Jeffrey Sachs:

"We're still facing massive general cuts in foreign assistance in the 2018 budget. It would literally cripple our aid efforts, and millions of people would suffer as a result. This conference is titled 'NOW MORE THAN EVER' for a very good reason, and that's because now more than ever your voices are critical to preserve America's leadership in global development.

...

Don't cut food for people who are starving. Don't cut medicine for people who need that life-saving assistance. Don't cut girls and women out from opportunity and equality. And don't cut hope, and don't cut lives."


Nunn advised the event's attendants to "stand up" and "not be silenced" on the issue of "foreign assistance," presumably advocating for political agitation to preserve and expand America's funding for the enterprise of "international development."

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