Last week, political commentator and The War on Cops author Heather Mac Donald was shouted down from speaking at Claremont McKenna College by fascist protesters who purport to be standing up to alleged "racism." Naturally, these anti-racist crusaders segregated themselves by race.

So-called "white accomplices" at the CMC protest were directed to segregate themselves from the group and move to the front of the demonstration to serve as a "buffer" between non-white protesters and police officers, reports Campus Reform.

In a post obtained by The Claremont Independent, a Facebook group of about 250 people called "ShutDown Anti-BlackFascists" wrote the following:

For white accomplices: Please keep in mind that your role at this protest, aside from acting in solidarity with POC students at the 5Cs, particularly Black students, is to serve as a buffer between students of color and the police. That means, if the police come, it is imperative that you stay at the protest with fellow accomplices and engage with cops should it come to that.

Protest leaders at the event reportedly yelled, "White students to the front!”

Peak irony here from the unwitting "anti-racism" activists. ​

The Facebook page also instructs white people, labeled as "accomplices," as to how they can behave themselves in similar situations, via an "accomplice meeting" at Scripps Student Union.

“There is a high likelihood that campus security and police will be present,” says the "ShutDown Anti-BlackFascists" Facebook page. “[S]o please attend the accomplice meeting at the Scripps Student Union today at 3:30 pm to act given that situation or one where counter protesting is taking place. It is very important that there are white bodies at the action–please show up yourself for the entire duration of the event or if not have friends who can be trusted to go in your place.”

The students were protesting Mac Donald, who popularized the so-called "Ferguson Effect," the wave of dangerous police inaction and hesitation following the riots in Ferguson, Missouri over the justified shooting of Michael Brown. Mac Donald, backed up by statistical data, argued that officers are not only put at increasing risk from such anti-police sentiment, but that crime will also metastasize in such an environment.