Senator Kirsten Gillibrand, (D-NY), appears to be angling for higher office, and knows as well as anyone else which way the wind is blowing in the Democratic Party. Thus she cast the most “no” votes against Trump’s Cabinet nominees of any senator and is now using the kind of rough-hewn language that will endear here to the most hard-line leftists in the party.

Thus, in a profile of her in New York Magazine, Gillbrand, speaking of the Family Act, her big paid-family-leave bill, blustered, “We’re here to help people, and if we’re not helping people, we should go the fuck home.”

That gentle rhetoric is, in all likelihood, an attempt to outflank Senator Elizabeth Warren and Hillary Clinton if they should decide to pursue the Democratic presidential nomination in 2020. As New York Magazine noted, “Warren’s constituents were so furious after she voted for HUD Secretary Ben Carson that she was forced to explain herself on Facebook.”

In late February, speaking to the Bridge Street AME Church in the Bedford-Stuyvesant area of New York, Gillibrand bloviated, “Each elected leader has been placed in that position of authority for a time such as this … We are the ones who have to fight against the hateful words that come from the highest places, from the places of power in Washington.” She urged the congregation to “put on the full armor of God, so that on the day evil comes, today, you’ll be able to stand your ground … That is what we are called to do!”

So now Trump and his administration are “evil.” Nice.

Gillibrand referenced Philippians, shouting “We are the ones that God placed here at a time such as this to fight!”

Gillibrand hyperventilated:

I’ve certainly never lived through an era like this. I’ve never lived through a moment in history where people are using their voices and becoming strong advocates for what they believe in … The grassroots are doing this. I mean, nobody told them to do it. Nobody told women to march. Nobody told people to run to JFK after the immigration ban. The message isn’t coming from Washington; that’s the crux. The message is coming from regular people, and no one is telling them what to do.

Gillibrand will undoubtedly be hurt with the Left by the fact that she received more in donations from Goldman Sachs than any other Democratic incumbent for her 2012 race. But her efforts to bypass the military by fighting for the Military Justice Improvement Act, which would remove prosecutorial authority from the military chain of command, will delight the Left.

Gillibrand offered the classic Democratic position about her compassion, that “not enough people have enough empathy. They can’t put themselves in someone else’s shoes. If they’ve lived an affluent life, they can’t imagine how expensive day care is. They don’t know why paid leave is important. They just don’t see it.”

Gillibrand calls the Women’s March “the most inspiring moment of my life — because I believed five years ago that the women’s movement was dead.”

Asked whether she will run for president in 2020, Gillibrand evaded, “I am running for the Senate in 2018.” But she also said, “I am exceedingly sincere when I say this: People only defeat Trumpism if everyone uses their voices on whatever platform they have available to them.”